Do you prefer console MIDI or MIDI from connected players like Roland or Yamaha? console

Do you prefer console MIDI or MIDI from connected players like Roland or Yamaha?

console

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pc with Sound Canvas 55

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Roland in general was best for a lot of the old stuff until digital media formats like ogg and mp3.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have a SC-88 and a EXR-3. I do like using them for MIDI output while gaming.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      To me that's really grating. Harsh, overbearing and way too much reverb. In actual gameplay I'd much rather use the adlib soundtrack. It's still not "good" music, but it's not constantly trying to "win" against everything else for your attention.
      PC MIDI in general kinda sucks. It's like everything is played with 100% velocity and there's no subtlety to it. And all you ever hear is the same Doom buttrock and Monkey Island tracks. The x68000 has some more variety and less ear rape. But still, those same tracks just sound so much better coming out of a yamaha FM or PS1 programmable wavetable.
      From a technical standpoint a Gravis or AWE32 is superior to the PS1, but there's like 0 examples of it being used to the same effect in commercial games. You have to go demoscene to get anything actually good.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    playstation was far more flexible and could have unique sounds. roland shit all sounds the same: bland.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      a lot of PS samples were sampled from Roland synths and general midi is general midi, it is as flexible as it is.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >why yes, I did get all my knowledge on this subject from watching a youtube, how could you tell

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I've been using MIDI for half my life, projecting dumbass

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            A whole 6 years. Impressive.

            he's kind of right though, roland samples were everywhere in the 90s and 00s, it was like a plague

            >The youtube he watched is kinda right
            That's why I pointed out that he got all he knows from it. Because kiddos who mindlessly parrot shit they heard on youtube literary are a plague. The cancer that killed /vr/

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          he's kind of right though, roland samples were everywhere in the 90s and 00s, it was like a plague

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >t. not autistic

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did any game really benefit from Yamaha XG?
    I know Final Fantasy 8 has support for it but nobody ever talks about how it sounds

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ?si=TNLsAnyqSFv8D_cw

    According to a comment left on this video by the game's composer Andrew Barnabas, he wrote all the original MIDI music tracks 'on a tracker program for the PS1 and Saturn,' which were all apparently later converted to General MIDI (presumably by the sound engineer).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Tons of synths supported GM and XG, many with much better sound and effects than the basic-b***h home music systems they sold to gamers and bedroom musicians. But people don't like them because the music sounds better and not "authentic" which in the case of even the SC-55, is not super great. None of the Sound Canvas modules even have balanced outputs.

      Trackers have supported MIDI directly for a while, since those days for sure.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sound Canvas was prosumer gear, no wonder.
        Personally I specifically like it because it's different to what I grew up with.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I would say the Sound Canvas line is enthusiast gear, even. Not even prosumer. Prosumer would be the somewhat neutered synths that were common in those days. Intentionally gimped in some way or another be it less polyphony, etc.

          I have a number of Sound Canvases, an MT-32, a D-110 (which is the professional non-gimped version of the MT-32), and a number of other synths which can do GM. K2000, Quadrasynth, EX5, others. All the professional synths sound much better for a number of reasons but again, the authentic sound "as the developer intended" is probably the MT-32 or SC-55, because that's what people had in the home mostly. But it's fun to hear things on different synths too. Current Yamaha and Roland professional flagship workstation synths still support GM operation. I don't know if they stuck to their classic GM sample sets or if they use the big multi-gigabyte multisampled instruments they have in ROM (flash?) these days though.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >tracker
      Driver 1&2 on PSX used a weird ass implementation of FastTracker II for the outdoor music.
      Just the .XM with the sequence and the samples stored in a separate file.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >yfw nukeykt will be doing the gravis ultrasound next
    https://x.com/nukeykt/status/1795054131519930822

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Here's my question - did any actual games support GS or XG? If so, which ones? I've looked and can't actually find any. Other than demo songs it's difficult to find any GS or XG files at all actually.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Final Fantasy VII's PC port is XG compatible.

      A whole 6 years. Impressive.
      [...]
      >The youtube he watched is kinda right
      That's why I pointed out that he got all he knows from it. Because kiddos who mindlessly parrot shit they heard on youtube literary are a plague. The cancer that killed /vr/

      doubling down isn't making you look less moronic

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Final Fantasy VII's PC port is XG compatible.
        based, i will have to hook it up to my ex5 and see how it sounds

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    GSXCC

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    idk but xenogears had surprisingly good music for sequenced audio

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    do you instead mean the soundfont or sound module that is being driven using midi? midi has no sounds.

    if thats the case, a console can sound like a connected sound module if it was programmed to do so.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >soundfont
      there were actual synths that synthesized sounds and had MIDI, not samples/soundfonts

      >if thats the case, a console can sound like a connected sound module if it was programmed to do so.
      make a SNES sound like a SC-55, I'm waiting
      even though it can play samples, it can't have enough instruments, even with CPU mixing

      >inb4 making the snes play a long pre-mixed sample like literally modern recoded music files

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >there were actual synths that synthesized sounds and had MIDI, not samples/soundfonts

        yes, but the synth having MIDI compatibility is completely immaterial to the synth making noise. The NES had a very rudimentary synth. the genesis had an FM Synth with a handful of parameters along with the same kinda of rudimentary synth as the NES. They both can be made to use MIDI to execute music code, so would they count for your example?

        >make a SNES sound like a SC-55, I'm waiting
        >even though it can play samples, it can't have enough instruments, even with CPU mixing

        you know that channel capacity is determined by the device capability, not by the MIDI compatibility? So if you line up a MIDI sound module with 8 channels, there's little reason an SNES can't sound like it if it was programmed to. If you lined up the SC-55 with 16 channels, there's little reason a playstation or saturn couldn't sound like it.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    for me its specialized midi

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      explain

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        general midi just tries to do too much, I like a midi that put all its skill points into one tree if you know what I mean

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