Does "adventurer" make sense as an occupation?

Does "adventurer" make sense as an occupation?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Literally just use the word mercenary

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why? Adventurer has been a relatively respectable career multiple times throughout history. Significantly more respected than an individual calling himself a mercenary without being a part of a mercenary army.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >relatively respected career
        its not a career

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        In a fantasy setting it does.

        Mercenaries get payed wages and are there to do a job (usually as hired muscle)

        If you get paid you're a mercenary, if you don't get paid it's not a career. Depending on what the "adventure" is, you even might as well call them private contractors.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You're assuming the only thing RPG adventurers do would be fight in wars. Until level 9, that is the one thing RPG adventurers never do.

          >relatively respected career
          its not a career

          If it's not a career, then why does every famous adventurer throughout history have it listed as a career?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're assuming that the only thing real-life mercenaries do would be to fight in wars. Hired muscle is hired muscle

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Private security is not mercenary work.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Actually, it is.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Only in a modern linguistic drift of the term.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                If it was a permanent position it would be work as a guard. However, Adventuers are itinerant so you're a mercenary.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      In a fantasy setting it does.

      Mercenaries get payed wages and are there to do a job (usually as hired muscle)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I use whatever words I want homosexual.

      [...]

      Lurk more, these threads are the soul of /tg/.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    More like part time merchant's prostitute

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe if someone is playing as you.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Does "adventurer" make sense as an occupation?
    yes
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Viking_explorers

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    An adventurer is:
    >a person who enjoys or seeks adventure
    >a person willing to take risks or use dishonest methods for personal gain
    >a financial speculator (archaic use)
    By the second and third definitions, adventurer inherently makes sense as an occupation; stock exchangers, entrepreneurs, things of that nature.
    Now, let's work out what an adventure is:
    >an unusual and exciting, typically hazardous, experience or activity
    >engage in hazardous and exciting activity, especially the exploration of unknown territory (as a dated verb)
    There are certainly a number of occupations that can be considered unusual and exciting, and a lot that are hazardous. Some people derive excitement *from* the hazardous nature of their occupation.

    And now that I'm done being a smartass for the sake of entertainment, I'll address what you actually mean.
    Whether or not regularly adventuring can be occupational depends on the world itself and the decisions on how it's run by the person running the game.
    This is such a vacuous and broad question that it can only be answered with tautology; adventurer makes sense as an occupation in worlds where it makes sense to be an occupational adventurer.
    I recommend just running your games how you want, instead of caring so much about what strangers on the internet think.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Your reminder that adventurer has been a real world occupation that adults engage in for entire careers for the last seven hundred years, inclusive of 2024.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Some of the biologists I have met come pretty close. Actually saving villages from the big bad, romping though the forest getting chased by bears, living off the land like a ranger. Depending on how enterprising and capable you are, adventure is a real career.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Lord Miles is a modern day adventurer. Dude just heads to war torn countries and hangs out with the locals

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Some of the biologists I have met come pretty close. Actually saving villages from the big bad, romping though the forest getting chased by bears, living off the land like a ranger. Depending on how enterprising and capable you are, adventure is a real career.

      To continue that thought, academia can get pretty weird like that too. Rowing across the Atlantic in a rustic boat just to prove that vikings could do it. Traveling to exotic places to study languages and cultures.
      Surveyors actually get paid to frick off into the woods and climb mountains.
      You can actually just be a high seas sailor for a major shipping company.
      Search and rescue is a real job that features everything from helicopters and mountaineering to EMT work.
      Wildland firefighting
      Just joining the fricking military <- less recommended
      The world is out there guys; You kinda have to prove you're not a pathetic milkbag to do it (intellectually more than anything) but there is demand.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >You kinda have to prove you're not a pathetic milkbag to do it (intellectually more than anything) but there is demand.
        How do you do that without money? Nobody gives a frick if you're intelligent if you lack the means to get an opportunity

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >How do you do that without money?
          you are doing most of those things to get money or, in many case in academia, was granted money to do one of those things and report results

          you never simple get an opportunity, you need to look for them and often be able to make a pitch to a patron

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          1) Self fund
          2) Schmooze
          3) crime time

          Those are your only options in this world.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Your reminder that adventurer has been a real world occupation that adults engage in for entire careers for the last seven hundred years.
      Make that seven thousand years.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not saying you're wrong but I don't have the historical knowledge to say you're right. Can you give me an example of a career adventurer from 1000 years before the founding of Mesopotamia?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The guys who went there first and killed all the dragons so Mesopotamia could be founded.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This must be true because I cannot prove it false. That's science for you.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              No. Go eat a book.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Adventurer was an occupation in our world. Conquistadors and explorers are obvious candidates, but also rogues and charlatans could be considered "adventurers."

    They might not be reputable, but they're still occupations nevertheless.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So I have created a houserule for my OSR game where an adventurer is someone who specifically can do adventures in a dungeon without suffering massive fricking penalties to everything they do, since dungeons are metaphysical accretions of evil. You can also look at the dark elf book that I wrote for ACKS (2nd draft, the final draft will be on sale).

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Bonney

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It can.

    For example, in most Pulp settings, "Private Eye" is a perfectly valid career path that's basically the 1920s urban version of an adventurer.

    As is just straight-up adventurer, now that I think about. Going to far off lands to document their people and steal their loot.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on your world.
    In Earthdawn, all sentient beings had to hide in magical bunkers because the cycle of magic in the world peaked and ripped apart the borders of reality, so demons roamed the earth for 500 years. When the levels of magic dropped again, so that the worst demons had to leave back to the nether realms, there was a whole continent to reclaim when the bunker doors opened. The whole world had to be mapped anew, neighbouring bunkers had to be checked and informed that it's safe outside, the remaining low tier demons had to be dealt with and those bunkers that were broken during the plague became quite literally dungeons full of defensive traps, filled with the zombies and treasures of the victims who lost against the demon intruders.
    Being the guys who open the bunker doors and go out there is quite obviously an adventurer career if I ever saw one.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Adepts in Earthdawn already have a title and it's not "adventurer." Also after they've saved the village and dealt with the other local problems, normal people usually want them to leave because Adepts are dangerous and frequently weird themselves.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Earthdawn is also sad because the mundanes who still make up the majority of the setting are nothing but background characters because the tech level wasn't there yet.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Kinda, "adventurer" isn't a job the same way being an entrepreneur strictly isn't but still broadly defines the field of your living endeavour.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Entrepreneurs don't take risks for their occupations?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No. They make other people take risks for them. Now frick off back to your containment board, failson.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The only risk that a damn capitalist has is the risk of becoming a worker like us.
        We beheaded the nobles for taking 10% of our products. Which capitalist only takes 10% of the products of the work of other people? They should risk the guillotine again.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Entrepreneurs don't take risks for their occupations?
        Namely yes, also adventurers do (picrel), hence the parallel.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What system would it make sense to have a character like this, someone with a sword and no shield?

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Let's try to define it
    >A self-funded explorer and mercenary, working in co-op with similarly aligned individuals, with typical tasks including, but not limited to:
    >Landmark surveying
    >Historical artifact retrieval
    >Law enforcement deputy activities
    >Peacekeeping and mediation
    >Overthrowal of local governance
    >Guerilla fighting
    >Big-game hunting
    >Disaster relief
    Yeah, on one hand, the typical list of what a given D&D-ish adventurer would be expected to take part in, it doesn't make that much sense to classify this as an occupation. However, keep in mind that in a renaissance or early modern settings quite a few of those would be expected jobs for military units as well. Being unconcerned with citizenship and rank, selling off their services as officers, experts and direct force to a highest bidder is not unknown - this maps easily onto what a privateer or corsair of the era would do, but extending to overland activities.
    And this is actually how I prefer to run my games. Players as a party have a noble patron of high standing and get a letter of mark, allowing all kinds of extrajudicial activities as long as they perform them in the general interests of their lord. This also helps to set up conflicts between their personal interests as a group once they reach high enough standing to become movers of their own.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lewis and Clark

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Robbing a bank is and adventure, exploring a jungle is an adventure, going to war is an adventure, escaping a kidnapping is an adventure, encountering a bear in a forest and surviving is an adventure, traveling on a plane about to be hijacked will be an adventure. It's not a job just a descriptor like vagabond, some may seek situations prone to trouble and others just suffer trouble. In rpgs adventurer is an euphemism to attract morons from all backgrounds who do odd jobs because the reward outweights the risk for them.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If the context is correct for the setting then yes you fricking mongoloid.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Adventurer is a lifestyle, not an occupation. What exactly your job title is will change from place to place, as will the details of your work, but they all fall under the general umbrella of 'Adventurers' so thats what its useful to use as a generic label.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's basically a freelance mercenary. Useful if you live in a world full of vampires, goblins, and dragons. Being organized in small groups also means you don't need the kind of regulation kingdoms would put on big mercenary companies that could plausibly wage war on a city or take over a small town.

    "Adventurer" however, isn't an occupation. You don't get paid for "Adventuring". You go on adventures for personal reasons and you do mercenary work to fund these journeys. If you can find treasure on the way, great! More often then not you're a sword for hire just for your daily bread.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, "adventurer" was a real thing, particularly on the frontier regions of empires or civilizations.
    European adventurers roamed the entirety of the New World. Russian adventurers travelled across Siberia. Turco-Persian adventurers swept across India during the late Abbasid Caliphate, Arab and other nomadic adventurers migrated into sub-saharan Africa during the 1400s to 1800s. German adventurers pushed into the Baltic regions during the Northern Crusades, Scandinavian adventurers journeyed all across Europe during the Viking Era.
    The line between adventurer, warlord and pirate was very blurry.
    Harald Hadrada was an adventurer turned king

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anything that you can live off of is a legitimate occupation. Some wagies get angry about this statement.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      NOOOO UNLESS YOU'RE DOING REGULAR 9 TO 5 WORK IT'S NOT A REAL JOB

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not really, adventurers are great at seizing loot and plunder, but terrible at holding territory.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most major cultures on Earth have "adventurers" as significant figures. Asia has them, Europe has them, even America in its relatively short history has loads of adventurers. If Lewis & Clark, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie, and Theodore Roosevelt weren't adventurers then I don't know who the frick is.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >relatively short history
      The history of the Americas goes back 11000 years, moron. The things you know about didn't manage to make up the tiniest fraction of human knowledge.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He is speaking of the United States. No doubt there were "adventurers" in previous ages in the Americas before the USA existed but we dont know much about them. Maybe the ancestors of the Aztecs were adventurers

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    We have mercenaries working in the world now. Why wouldn't adventurer be a profession?

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Does a guy who works for a gang dedicated purely to plunder and killing makes sense in real life?

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Apart from the historical notes that other anons have made, it's worth pointing out that "adventurer" in its modern context makes a lot more sense in the context of fantasy games, where supernatural or otherwise very powerful threats are commonplace enough that a specially-trained sword-for-hire willing to put their life on the line for the safety of a local village would be able to sustain their existence.

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not in the way it's depicted in most game's I've been in

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Makes a bit more sense in most fantasy settings where everything is built on top of the somehow still un-plundered ruins of advanced civilizations

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    "Adventuring companies" aka mercenaries actually existed so yes.

  29. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Of course, there have been entire continets conquered be them. A venture goes from the crew of any comercial med ship going from port to port and being the ocasional pirate here and there, than its been tradition since the sea people,or entire armies of desperados than put themselves in danger for coin and glory, like the conquistadors/bandeirantes of the east indies companies or those said sea people.
    The aventurer guilds aren't that weird in that way, as guilds were comon and even used to be a way to form militias, its only a venturer guild would be about going in a venture to x place to get y and posible conquest z and get fame, peerage and money.

  30. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    in practice an adventurer is just a graverobber/ mercenary.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      don't forget exterminator/pest control

  31. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I prefer the term, "prostitute."

  32. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Of course, it's a common profession around here

  33. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sure, the French Foreign Legion is almost two hundred years old.

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