62 thoughts on “Help me understand the mindset of the sort of person who pays for emulation.”

  1. They have a job, disposable income and no time to hunt for ROMs or set up emulators in their PCs. They just want to turn on their console and play.

    Help me understand the mindset of the sort of person who uses emulation. Are they NEETs that stay in front of their PCs all day?

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  2. Piracy is a service problem. People that aren’t poorhomosexuals or 3rd worlders are more than willing to pay for ports and emulation on modern consoles provided the service (games) are fair and equitable. For example, plenty of people bought the 4 Konami compilations because they’re all priced fairly, or were handled by a competent developer (M2). People bought the Mega Man Legacy Collection for the same reasons. People begrudgingly bought SM3DAS because of FOMO. People typically pirate Nintendo’s shit because Nintendo has ass history of NOT porting their most sought after games on modern platforms, charging an unreasonable amount for them, or outright refusing to localize them in the case of MOTHER 3 to the point where it’s become a meme acknowledged by Reggie himself.

    tl;dr: People pay for emulation when it’s convenient, and pirate when left with no choice.

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    • why pay money when you could pay zero money?
      especially when zero money gets you a higher quality experience than if you had payed money.

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  3. You see the
    >Zoomers don’t understand file systems
    Article that was going around? Do you think these people can load a ROM into an emulator?

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    • Zoomers don’t understand filesystems because they don’t actually have any incentive to, they don’t *have* to. It’s on the same level as that webm of a young child trying to use a device with buttons as a touch-device and being confused, it’s a software generational gap and they’re on a completely different wavelength with completely different requirements. If they had a reason to learn and use filesystems they’d be able to with no problem.

      You, however, are straight delusional if you think a drag-and-drop menu is outside the scope of a slack-jawed retard, let alone a zoomer.

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  4. I’m an idiot and setting up emulators to run properly without crashing or glitches and setting up the controls and dealing with plugins frustrates me. I’d rather just pay the money and play a nearly perfect emulation from bed on my Switch. Yes I know I’m retarded but there we are.

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  5. Does launchbox count as paying for emulation? I haven’t, but the longer I go with an outdated pirated version the closer I get.

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  6. Nothing to understand really. They are exactly the uninformed, inexperienced consumers they appear to be. Capitalism would not work if your common citizen were not braindead with their money.

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  7. A better question is understanding the mindset of somebody that feigns ignorance as to why anybody would pay to have old games on their Switch. Nobody was shouting "just emulate it!" for the Wii Virtual Console like they are now with the Switch.

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  8. OP, you ever heard of emulation fatgue? It’s a real think. You have access to all this free shit, but you get burnout and never play any of them.

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    • Nah, my problem is that a select few games are sapping up all my time. FTL and Creeper World and TF2 won’t let me play anything else.

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  9. I’ll never understand why obese people have this stand, like, stand up correctly you fucker you’ll look taller and healthier.

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  10. Because they realize that people working in their freetime to preserve old games deserve it more than money grabbing publishers?

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  11. Everything depends on service. If someone feels like it’s more convenient to pay, they will. I’m not retarded and I can just fire up m64p to play N64 games so Nintendo’s service gives me no advantage whatsoever, but retards who can’t use emulators will pay for ease of use, even if Nintendo’s offer is actually more limiting in the end.

    Reply

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