How Divided is the Tetris Fandom?

I’ve seen here https://youtu.be/0j_fp5L8Si8?si=38jqtu-quBCBFx7o that classic Tetris (i.e. NES, Game Boy, etc. versions) players have entirely different playing styles from those of modern Tetris (i.e. The New Tetris (N64), Tetris Effect (Steam), etc.) players, creating a stark divide between the two communities as a result.

Is any of this true? I’ve played both varieties of this game and while there are a few key differences, I don’t know whether they are enough to warrant the fandom being divided like this.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    NES Tetris has no holding a piece, no shadow, no t-spins, probably more

    That's the only one I know

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I’m aware of this, but why does this mean the two eras of the game are apparently so divided? It may not be that difficult for someone who has grown up with one play style to get used to the other. I’m somewhat used to the GB and GBC versions of the game, but I have played modern Tetris and see how it may be faster paced, though I don’t see why people would turn their noses up at playing games from the different eras.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        In a competitive setting they shouldn't be expected to play the version they're not used to

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Then what is stopping people from being used to both styles of play? It’s a bit like how we change our habits of going outside and dressing for the different seasons.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            you become worse in general if you diversify
            jack of all trades master of none applies to real life

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I don’t understand why if it only affords us new challenges and forces us to become more intelligent.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                that's not how it works. you lose practice over time if you're away from the thing you're good at

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Do you not know what a tournament is or 'competitive' means?
            Yes, I agree that overall trying the different playstyles is ideal.
            However, it's different if you're preparing for a tournament. You'll look up the rules of the the tournament is about beforehand and use them.
            This is why a lot of tourneygays turn out to be insufferable close-minded gays who can't step out of their zone, but it can't be helped.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Then how come we don’t see any modern Tetris players take part in classic Tetris tournaments and vice versa? They could easily adjust to the new (or rather old) styles of play, especially given that “Tetris Effect” has an NES mode.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Because it's two different games, you fricking autist. People that compete hone muscle memory to that specific version of the game. You don't understand the implications of that because you've never been better than "can complete with mininal hand-holding" at anything in your life.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Would a “classic” Tetris tournament use the GBC version? Or is the “classic” descriptor exclusive the NES, Game Boy, SNES, etc. versions?

          The GBC version has wall climbing, but it is somewhat difficult to pull off at higher levels, and it came out at around the same time “Tetris 64” and “The New Tetris” did, but I would probably list “Tetris 64” among the classic games before the modern ones.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            “Tetris 64” may arguably be the last of the “classic era” games in the series before “Tetris Effect” came out with its classic mode. Though I don’t know how most of the fandom views it and the GBC version, especially with the subtle differences between them and the NES, GB, and SNES versions.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              If “Tetris 64” were to be used in a classic Tetris tournament, the settings would all need to be reset to their defaults if the game can be this customizable.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                “Tetris 64” may arguably be the last of the “classic era” games in the series before “Tetris Effect” came out with its classic mode. Though I don’t know how most of the fandom views it and the GBC version, especially with the subtle differences between them and the NES, GB, and SNES versions.

                Would a “classic” Tetris tournament use the GBC version? Or is the “classic” descriptor exclusive the NES, Game Boy, SNES, etc. versions?

                The GBC version has wall climbing, but it is somewhat difficult to pull off at higher levels, and it came out at around the same time “Tetris 64” and “The New Tetris” did, but I would probably list “Tetris 64” among the classic games before the modern ones.

                How subtle would the differences need to be for trained players to be able to play them in tournament settings? Would people who are accustomed to the NES and Game Boy versions have trouble with the GBC, SNES, or N64 versions?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It took 35 years for people to fully master NES Tetris. Which is objectively a simpler style of Tetris.
        If your goal is competitive/speedrunning, then every time you play a different game, is time your competition gets ahead.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Then what is stopping people from being used to both styles of play? It’s a bit like how we change our habits of going outside and dressing for the different seasons.

        They're different fricking video games all you have to do is play both for a while to intuitively understand this
        NES Tetris pieces lock immediately after placing. Modern Tetris gives you insane leeway with this but that also allows it to reach instant drop speed. Completely different fricking gameplay basically.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          So where would you place “Tetris DX” and “Tetris 64”? They seem to be games that have features of both eras.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not familiar with the Tetris "community" but the biggest divisor that I've heard about is T-spins. That is, if the game allows you to constantly keep a piece active by repeatedly spinning it.

        Other than that, a lot of people have a single preferred place they like to play the game and so they stick with their system. Sure, a Tetris player can jump into Tetris Effect or something like Tetr.io, but they'll typically dump their efforts into the platform they prefer. So you have a lot about people playing NES Tetris, but they're not interacting much with people over on Tetr.io and aren't playing much with people on Tetris Effect. This largely ends up boiling down to preferring one game style and/or preferring one system, but I don't know many people who are shitting on other versions the same way that the Smash community acts.

        You'll have people obviously disagree about the best version of Tetris, but I've generally see people give pretty similar answers over which versions are good and which versions to avoid.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No 7-bag piece distribution

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I’m pretty sure that classic Tetris has T-spins, but they are far more difficult to pull off. I can probably count the number of times I was able to do it in the S/NES and Game Boy versions on one hand, but it is a somewhat normal part of playing “Tetris DX” and “Tetris 64”.

      No 7-bag piece distribution

      Does this basically mean that pieces are less likely to be uniform in distribution in the modern games?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, in 7-bag you get a full set of all individual seven pieces which are mixed up with RNG and pulled out, then a new 7-bag set starts. NES Tetris piece distribution on the other hand - although not completely random - aren't guaranteed to get an 'I' piece, as an example, within the next seven pieces like modern Tetris, which is why in competition you sometimes hear of a 'drought' when players are desperately in need of one to appear. I've seen droughts of 30 pieces or more

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >youtube vid
    probably exaggerated beyond belief cause that's what get the clicks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Then how come we have never really seen people like EricICX play games like “The New Tetris” or TGM and we have never seen people like Firestorm58 play the NES or Game Boy versions?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        For competitive Tetris specifically, there are 3 different scenes large enough worth noting and they have little overlap in their competitive playerbases.

        >NES Tetris (a.k.a. Classic)
        This one is dominated by learning how to mash the directional pad extremely quickly. Although you may have the skill and knowledge of where to place a piece, simply holding left or right before the piece comes out is not enough to get it all the way to the left or right at the highest speed. The current pros wear gloves and mash the controller to get it done (they call it rolling). This one is played for single-player high score and in-person 1v1 tournaments. It's all about endurance.

        >Modern Tetris (a.k.a. Guideline or SRS)
        This one, because of how trivial the single-player is, is played competitively in multiplayer. Players are very skilled at taking advantage of the 7-bag randomizer, hold mechanic and 6 preview pieces to use pre-determined setups to overwhelm their opponents. These ones require very high apm and piece-efficiency in general. The popular one nowadays is tetr.io.

        >Tetris the Grandmaster Series (TGM)
        Three separate arcade games from Japan that are much more niche in the West because of that fact (although there are now ports for PS4 and Switch for the first 2 games). These are single-player time-attack games with definite and designed endpoints to beat each mode. They are the hardest and most skill-based versions of Tetris to play in my opinion. It can take years of playing to get skilled enough to even clear a gamemode.

        So each of them, while similar at a casual level, have very different competitive elements at the top level. Very few can jump from being a top player in one to a top player in another quickly.

        You're right in general, but EricICX is a bad example here and an outlier. He is currently the world record holder in TGM3 Shirase Classic, debatably the hardest version of Tetris out there: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPVJDFRDIFs

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >debatably the hardest version of Tetris out there
          I thought it was the normal mode of TGM3. How many grand masters are there in the world?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, that's why I said debatably. Different people will say different things, but they are both insanely difficult.

            Also, there is difficulty relative to beating the current world record, for which TGM1 is probably the hardest. The world record has remained untouched since 2010. The guy who set has played very frequently since then and still has not beaten it. Probably one of the hardest records to beat in video gaming.

            For TGM3 master mode specifically, there is a lot more information out there now on how to get the GM grade. Without getting too technical about it, there are points where you will intentionally slow down to meet the requirements and otherwise manipulate the hidden requirement counters. The invisibility check at the end is still very hard, and don't get me wrong, the mode is still insanely difficult, just not as much as it once was.

            https://tetris.wiki/List_of_Terror-Instinct_Grand_Masters
            There are 21 known GMs in classic rule and 26 known in World rule, with some players having it in both styles. World rule is easier to achieve and is based on modern Tetris (i.e. SRS).

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >https://tetris.wiki/List_of_Terror-Instinct_Grand_Masters
              My knowledge was outdated. For me the last one was the American KevinDDR. The list increased since that time.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Even if EricICX isn’t the world record holder, it may be nice to know that at least some people are willing to make the jump. Though my search for “EricICX TGM” came up virtually empty and the only footage I’ve seen of him playing “Tetris Effect” is of the classic mode.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >This one is dominated by learning how to mash the directional pad extremely quickly.
          This is fricking lame. Awkwardly rolling a NES controller shouldn't be the ultimate skill of the game.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I like Tetris, and I can get nice scores, but not enough to attempt this level of Tetris. I'd like to try my hand at competition some day, but not like this. I would be happy to play a hack which removed the necessity of hypertapping. That should be the future of Tetris so people can play normally, but there will never be a Tetris NES 2.0 tournament. Even though they use custom software to run the CTWC, I doubt they would run a hack which removed hypertapping.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >This one is dominated by learning how to mash the directional pad extremely quickly.
              This is fricking lame. Awkwardly rolling a NES controller shouldn't be the ultimate skill of the game.

              2-player Game Boy Tetris doesn’t get to any point where this is necessary, since there is a 30-line cap. No such cap exists in the 2-player SNES game, but the marathon mode has a cap at Level 31, where it may be beneficial, but not absolutely necessary, to use these advanced techniques.

              The uniform playing style in “Dr. Mario” is actually one reason why some prospective CTWC players sign up for “Dr. Mario” tournaments.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >I would be happy to play a hack which removed the necessity of hypertapping. That should be the future of Tetris so people can play normally, but there will never be a Tetris NES 2.0 tournament.
              I’m pretty sure that “Tetris DX” for the GBC removed the necessity of hypertapping, though I wouldn’t be surprised if “classic” purists prefer the S/NES or GB version due to the rules that they have. Since “Tetris 64” may be the only other game that uses its rules, I don’t know how likely it is that one could find other players for tournaments.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              NES Tetris has DAS-only tournaments, i.e. no rolling, no hypertapping - the only advanced technique allowed is delayed auto-shift where you hold the direction you want the piece to shift in prior to it appearing, which gives it a small but advantageous speed boost.

              DAS is no longer as popular in the community but competitions still exist for those that want to keep it pure.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I don’t know how this could be enforced.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                hands and controller on camera if it's an online competition

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If it’s an online competition, people could just as well use modded controllers that allow for the mimicking of hypertapping or rolling through use of turbo buttons, especially if they are played through the Steam port of “Tetris Effect”.

                Said that to say: suspect that Tetris played better on Gameboy than NES versions. Have not proved that is a fact.

                No idea if someone already did or not.

                Does this mean that there is yet another divide among players of “classic Tetris” as to which one is better to them? Would someone who plays the S/NES version not want to play in a tournament that uses the Game Boy version?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The comment you're applying to is not in any way affiliated with any organization, group, or tournament and represents nothing but my own anecdotal and experiential perspective.

                If you are interested in Tetris tournament facts and policies, ask someone who participates or is involved within such a respective organization or group.

                Because I have no idea.

                I do not speak for them and they sure don't speak for me.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I don't think there's a lot of people trying to play Game Boy tetris competitively. it's similar enough to NES that everyone just kinda consolidated on that version.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                NES Tetris doesn’t have the “deathmatch” multiplayer mode that the SNES and Game Boy versions do.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >ericicx
          I thought it was kevinddr

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            kevinddr, although probably the most famous TGM player in the West, only has 1 TGM world record which he shares with the Japanese player KAN. That record is in the doubles mode of TGM2, they completed it together in 3:13.26.

            EricICX's record is for the shirase mode in TGM3. He's the only person outside of Japan to have ever held that particular record.

            https://tetris.wiki/List_of_TGM_series_world_records

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >We NEED to talk about the civil war happening in the tetris community

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The different ones that most people play are:

    NES Tetris
    Gameboy Tetris
    TGM1
    TGM2+3
    Guideline
    and I guess some people play SEGA Tetris too

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sega tetris is pretty good, it the falling speed that can turn people off, you press down and it just snaps down.
      The latest nes tournaments are very interesting to watch especially when the glitch colours happen at about level 130. In the next couple of years I expect someone to get to level 255 after which it will loop.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        So do you think we’ll ever see someone crash the game in a competitive setting? I wonder how much head-scratching the referees are going to have to do.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What about “Tetris Effect” on Steam and “The New Tetris” on the N64? Do many people play these?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      For competitive Tetris specifically, there are 3 different scenes large enough worth noting and they have little overlap in their competitive playerbases.

      >NES Tetris (a.k.a. Classic)
      This one is dominated by learning how to mash the directional pad extremely quickly. Although you may have the skill and knowledge of where to place a piece, simply holding left or right before the piece comes out is not enough to get it all the way to the left or right at the highest speed. The current pros wear gloves and mash the controller to get it done (they call it rolling). This one is played for single-player high score and in-person 1v1 tournaments. It's all about endurance.

      >Modern Tetris (a.k.a. Guideline or SRS)
      This one, because of how trivial the single-player is, is played competitively in multiplayer. Players are very skilled at taking advantage of the 7-bag randomizer, hold mechanic and 6 preview pieces to use pre-determined setups to overwhelm their opponents. These ones require very high apm and piece-efficiency in general. The popular one nowadays is tetr.io.

      >Tetris the Grandmaster Series (TGM)
      Three separate arcade games from Japan that are much more niche in the West because of that fact (although there are now ports for PS4 and Switch for the first 2 games). These are single-player time-attack games with definite and designed endpoints to beat each mode. They are the hardest and most skill-based versions of Tetris to play in my opinion. It can take years of playing to get skilled enough to even clear a gamemode.

      So each of them, while similar at a casual level, have very different competitive elements at the top level. Very few can jump from being a top player in one to a top player in another quickly.

      You're right in general, but EricICX is a bad example here and an outlier. He is currently the world record holder in TGM3 Shirase Classic, debatably the hardest version of Tetris out there: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPVJDFRDIFs

      I could imagine TGM being somewhat different if the board has so many random things that could happen to it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Perhaps another difference is the pieces spawning towards the top of the stack instead of the top of the play area.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Perhaps this all has something to do with the fact that the NES, Game Boy, and SNES versions all have pieces that stop moving nearly immediately after they touch other pieces, while other versions allow more flexibility. This may cause people to make mistakes if they aren’t used to this.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The GBC version only seems marginally more flexible, but the DAS is significantly faster. Could this perhaps cause issues or would hypertappers and rollers not be worried about this anyway?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know, but Tetris has always been incredibly boring and unfun to me, and I've been trying to find enjoyment in it for the past 20 years or so. I enjoy other puzzle games like Panel de Pon (bad at it) and especially Columns (decent at it), though.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Divided Tetris Fandom
    It's a fricking puzzle game from the 70s relegated that you play to kill time at the dentist's office. What the frick are you getting divided about? That you move the pieces a different way compared to someone else?
    lmao

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      whoops 80s*

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But the subtleties may make it all the more difficult, such as if one was trying to speedrun “Super Mario 64”, but Mario took longer to stop and all of the enemies were shuffled.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why is there such a strong tetris nes scene among zoomers?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because of the news of the 13-year-old kid from Oklahoma having “beaten” the game.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Because of the news of the 13-year-old kid from Oklahoma having “beaten” the game.

        it existed well before that though

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I guess this sort of enthusiasm about the game in competitive settings has its roots in the 1990 Nintendo World Championships, if not before, but it may have only been amplified by news of it having an “end”.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Dunno, here's my general theory:

      >Ecstacy of Order documentary is released and brings some exposure to competitive NES tetris
      >"Boom tetris for jeff" video/meme gets a lot of traction on youtube in 2016/2017 (millions of views)
      >Younger audience exposed to relatively niche competitive scene
      >Joseph Saelee is one of those people, goes on to compete and win the ctwc event as a teenager
      >Inspires other younger players
      >Covid happens and events are held online instead of in person for a time (easier for younger people to attend online then fly to a Tetris tournament)
      >Young people get really good and use/perfect physical techniques (rolling and previously hyper-tapping) to tap pieces faster
      >Jonas Neubauer (7-time champ from the old days) dies at age 39. RIP
      >The remaining older das players don't really want to learn this new technique to compete with the younger crowd
      >The scene is now mainly young people

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's what I think too. Jonas was the coolest dude, can't believe he died.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        happens and events are held online instead of in person for a time (easier for younger people to attend online then fly to a Tetris tournament)
        How would this work out? I understand that “marathon” gameplay could be used and judges could compare people’s scores from videos they upload, but I don’t understand how “deathmatch” tournaments where completing lines would send garbage pieces to one’s opponent would work.
        >>The remaining older das players don't really want to learn this new technique to compete with the younger crowd
        What do you mean? I got up to level 9 of Game Boy Tetris just now and I found that the DAS may be too slow if the stack is too high, so “hypertapping” or “rolling” may be a must past this point. On the bright side, I found that one strategy that could be used to make up for the lack of novel features afforded by modern Tetris games is to think where the piece in the “next” box will go as one is dropping the current piece, so the position of that piece should be decided before one even has control over it. I ended up getting the highest score I have ever gotten in a “classic” Tetris game and I hope I don’t accidentally forget about this strategy.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >>How would this work out?
          It did work out. I don't understand what you're asking, NES Tetris doesn't have the garbage lines mechanic. They start the games at the same time and a stream serves as proof. They still do this every month, full rules here: https://ctm.gg/rules/

          >What do you mean?
          Again, my post was about NES Tetris. Previously, level 29 was referred to the "kill screen" because, even with an empty playfield, the piece could not be moved all the way to the left or right with DAS alone. At a certain point in time, nobody had a physical technique for tapping that fast consistently, so level 29 was the de facto game over screen. The competition and skills of the players were based around having the highest score by this level. Many older players weren't interested in continuing to compete with this younger crowd and "relearning" how to play a game they have competed in for years. Some now play in DAS only tournaments like this anon mentioned

          NES Tetris has DAS-only tournaments, i.e. no rolling, no hypertapping - the only advanced technique allowed is delayed auto-shift where you hold the direction you want the piece to shift in prior to it appearing, which gives it a small but advantageous speed boost.

          DAS is no longer as popular in the community but competitions still exist for those that want to keep it pure.

          .

          >stack is too high, so “hypertapping” or “rolling” may be a must past this point
          So in this case, that was part of the old strategy of the DAS competition that is now gone. You have erred by making your stack too high. You should burn away the stack to keep it ready for a Tetris while keeping it very low. This was a big part of the risk-reward in level 19-28 speeds.

          >where the piece in the “next” box will go
          Yeah, this is essential to all Tetris games. You should know definitively where the next piece goes before it comes out. The best players can make "micro-adjustments" to where they initially were going to place the piece based on how quickly they recognize the next piece. In games with colour schemes, this becomes even easier because you can identify the piece in your peripheral vision based on its colour. You're definitely on the right track with this strategy.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >It did work out.
            I guess I ought to retract my statement now that I’ve found out that at least some emulators in addition to NSO allow online multiplayer matches for the SNES and Game Boy versions and possibly have for some time, but I doubt tournament organizers should encourage software piracy if they have people use emulators. Though it still may be hard to coordinate multiplayer “score attack” matches in any version if there is no in-game mechanism for a sort of “starting gun” or coordinated communication, since there being no defined, coordinated method of starting the game or playing the game together may mean that technical problems or cheating could lead to one person being screwed.
            >Previously, level 29 was referred to the "kill screen"
            I’m aware of this, but my comment was referring to the need for this on earlier levels, especially if the stack is more than halfway full.
            >This was a big part of the risk-reward in level 19-28 speeds.
            How does one get past level 20 in Game Boy Tetris, though? Or are you still referring to the NES version (and possibly the SNES version by extension)?

            Game boy Tetris and nes Tetris are not the same.

            No one cares. They're old.

            #
            Is this one reason why the AVGN called the NWC 1990 cartridge a “glorified sh*t grail”? Though by this logic, how come people like EricICX have followings within their communities and Blue Scuti will arguably be a household name at least for a little while?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >How does one get past level 20 in Game Boy Tetris, though?
              Yeah, I was talking about NES only. Level 20 is the max speed in Gameboy.

              Gameboy will require tapping, DAS is not as helpful and programmed differently in comparison to NES (i.e. the autorepeat is slower). Additionally, GB has 18 rows instead of the standard 20, so you naturally have less space to move things to the left and right.

              The general strategy to get a maxout in GB is to go for singles in the higher levels because of the absurdly long line clear animation (every line clear takes 93 frames, or about 1.5 seconds, before resuming the game). You will need to hypertap to get a maxout in this game, although you do not need to do this to get a maxout in NES.

              I'd generally stay away from this game as it's not very friendly to competitive play. Aside from hurting your thumbs, it has a bugged randomizer implementation.

              For nerds, see picrel. There are two pieces in memory at all times, the piece that is currently being controller and the piece in the "next box". Each of these pieces has a corresponding binary value. When deciding what the next piece to appear in the "next box" is going to be, the game randomly selects one of the 7 pieces. If the bitwise-or operation between this possible piece, the piece in the "next box" and the current piece is equal to the piece in the "next box", then the game will re-roll what the next possible piece is going to be. For example, if you get two T pieces in a row and the game wants to give you an I piece, it will reject that I piece because it mistakes it for a T piece.

              For non-nerds, this means that the pieces are not evenly random in practice. They are distributed as such:
              L: 10.7 %
              J, I, Z: 13.7 %
              O, S, T: 16.1 %
              Fricking moronic.

              So to play competitively, you have to keep all of this in mind and adapt your play to the randomizer. Add that to hypertapping and you've got a shit game. This is why there is little competitive GB play. Play NES instead.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Does this mean that the pieces in the S/NES version are distributed more fairly? I have seen that version give me more long bars, sometimes even multiple times in a row, but the Game Boy version seems to be more stingy with its long bars.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, the GB game is literally more stingy with long bars. You are statistically less likely to get them (the L piece being the rarest).

                I don't have much experience with SNES, so can't comment there. But NES is more fair, yeah. It generates a number between 1 and 8, 1-7 representing each piece and 8 representing a re-roll. The game will also re-roll if the 1-7 matches what the previous piece was. The re-roll rolls between 1 and 7. It does not have the issue that GB does where some pieces are more likely than others

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Would the “handednesses” of the rotation systems between games also throw people off or is this just a minor inconvenience?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                A frustrating, but minor inconvenience. If you play a lot of Tetris, some of this stuff becomes muscle memory.

                For example, if I was a NES player and I wanted to put an I piece (longbar) in column 9, I'd move it all the way to the right wall, let go of right, and then rotate it. That is just one smooth motion that I don't even think about. A muscle memory.

                If I was playing a lot of NES for some reason and then decided to pick up the GB version maybe this would happen. I'd encounter the same situation where I'd want to put an I piece in column 9, my muscle memory would kick in and I'd drop the piece in column 8 before I even realized what my fingers had done. Yeah, it'd be frustrating, and it would probably take 10 mins or so for me to properly adjust to the "handedness". Not to mention the longer period of time I would have to adapt to its "unique" randomizer as I laid out in my previous post.

                Then again, I'm a TGM player and a total Tetris snob.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Do you think it would throw off tournament players who are used to competing in competitions where the S/NES version is used or do you think they’d be fine adjusting to it?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                This guy makes it seem necessary to hypertap in the SNES version, which is just a remake of the NES version to my knowledge. https://youtu.be/kTMvyp8RNdw?si=RlUXa-JUqmlkLwL5

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because somehow in the span of three decades only zoomers realized pressing buttons faster is efficient play.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Tetris on game boy plays nothing like Tetris on NES.

    Sadly most of the other Tetris games are trash.

    There is something alluring about the sound of the Sega Genesis version though imo

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What makes you think so? The S/NES version seems to be about as strict in terms of piece placement and the DRS seems about as slow.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Said that to say: suspect that Tetris played better on Gameboy than NES versions. Have not proved that is a fact.

        No idea if someone already did or not.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Didn’t these changes start with “The New Tetris” for the N64?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That was probably the first retail release with the new rules and mechanics ordained by Pajitnov and The Tetris Company. Kinda silly for them to blame Tetris Worlds but it's a funny vid all the same.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does anyone else think that “Tetris Effect” needs to add the GB or SNES version? I love watching score attack matches on YouTube, but it would be nice to participate in online classic Tetris gameplay without the need to “hypertap” or “roll” so that more focus can be put onto the actual game and strategy. Mr. Pazhitnov didn’t design this game with speedrunning-style tactics in mind, after all.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Game boy Tetris and nes Tetris are not the same.

    No one cares. They're old.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Grey box tetris hard. Puzzle better hard. Easy Tetris for moron.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Apotris

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What is this?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Fanmade gba tetris game with modes from all the popular versions of tetris. It's good shit

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Effect Chads where we at

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I’d like to see them include a sort of “classic deathmatch mode” multiplayer with the Game Boy or SNES version. Though if it’s the latter, I hope they also improve the synthesized accordion sound.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a big TGM player (m9 in TGM3 so not a pro but better than most) and while I have an interest in at least watching NES Tetris I have absolutely zero capacity to enjoy guideline games. I know it's probably hard to see this from the outside but the fact is that minor modifications to the Tetris ruleset results in drastically different games.

    NES Tetris (and basically all pre-guideline games besides Sega Tetris and TGM) have an almost nonexistent lock delay, which means that the piece locks in the instant it touches the stack. This means that for these games to be playable for survival the time it takes the piece to reach the stack - i.e. the gravity - has to remain quite lenient. The challenge in these games comes down mainly to dealing with the randomizer and building contingency plans into your stack while also fighting with the idiosyncrasies of the controls.

    Guideline and TGM/Sega Tetris games diverge from the classic formula by increasing the lock delay, meaning that you can make the gravity literally infinite and the game is still playable. However, there's very little overlap between guideline players and TGM players because guideline games also give players a million other survival tools and a very generous randomizer. This results in survival being trivially easy for experienced players. By contrast, the TGM series uses lock delay as a mechanic to force the player to play really fast. The piece starts at the bottom of the screen, not the top, and you have to rapidly manipulate the piece into place. It's still fundamentally a survival game that only eventually becomes a speed game once you've completely mastered the mechanics. One illustration of this is TGM3's Shirase mode, which is the hardest mode to clear in the series. People are certainly competing for time, but even the best players in the world fail to clear it most of the time.

    Guideline games turn into a PvP contest because good players won't die. It's a totally different thing.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >NES Tetris (and basically all pre-guideline games besides Sega Tetris and TGM) have an almost nonexistent lock delay, which means that the piece locks in the instant it touches the stack.
      What about “Tetris DX” and “Tetris 64”? My impression seems like they don’t seem appealing to either group, since their lock delays and DAS’s would turn off classic Tetris players, while their lack of drop shadows and multiple “next” windows would turn off modern Tetris players, leaving players of “Tetris DX” and “Tetris 64” in their own, much smaller category.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I mean, most Tetris games don't have communities simply because the game isn't that compelling when played at a high level (Tetris DS is a good example of this). Some people do play Tetris DX, though.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Does this mean that the term “classic Tetris” typically refers to the S/NES and Game Boy versions specifically, possibly in addition to the Atari and other arcade/old computer versions?

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn’t this basically be like the debate between rugby union and rugby league? Minor differences between them have led to completely different styles of playing, though classism has had a role in separating the two as well.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If someone were to host a “classic Tetris” tournament, would the most people show up if it used the S/NES version, the Game Boy version, or some other version? It may be the easiest to set up the S/NES version if it were to be set up “the legit way” without the use of emulators, but the Game Boy version may be more popular, since its cartridges retail for about half as much as the former does on eBay.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Should we leave the Tengen and arcade versions out of the discussion?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don’t know, but CTWC did explicitly clarify that they weren’t using Tengen Tetris.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Would they have any reason to if it is such a rare cartridge to exist?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Tengen Tetris is worth mentioning if for no other reason than its phenomenal doubles mode. It's particularly good if you are an experienced player and you have a person who is far less experienced to play with and you want them to have a good time too.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I actually think that there should be a tournament that uses the “deathmatch” play that the Game Boy and SNES versions use so that there is a more uniform play style and people can focus on the game more so than their techniques.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >How Divided is the Tetris Fandom?
    I cannot think of a stupider fricking combination of words to ever escape someone's figurative mouth.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So how come we have never seen someone like PixelAndy play any of the modern Tetris games?

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Tetris Effect is the only one people should play.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >divided
    any "fan" of the series will gladly check out any version anon
    my favorites:
    gameboy
    final tetris arcade
    pokemon mini handheld
    japan virtual boy exclusive
    phillips cdi exclusive is good aside from control quirks
    ridonk ost

    mcnugget china brick officially licensed

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why not the S/NES version or the modern versions like “The New Tetris” or “Tetris Effect”?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i have played the snes and genesis versions
        but didnt feel compelled to sink as much time into those
        for people with nostalgia towards them im sure theyre great too
        as for modern titles i havent played much besides the one on the switch tetris99

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          So is all of this division simply over nostalgia, then?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            no

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Then why do you think this division exists?

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I suck.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not bad anon, I don't think you suck. You can do some overrhangs, have decent control and are fast enough to clear before 13:30. Some of your piece placements are not how I would do them, but still they aren't terrible.

      With some more practice and confidence you could definitely GM it if you haven't already.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >you could definitely GM it if you haven't already.
        I'm very far from that.

        This is definitely not the worst 20G gameplay I've ever seen.

        TGM is a hard game. The first one being the easiest in the series doesn't detract from the fact that TGM is a hard game. Have you tried the sequels? Personally I like playing the original the least and I find it very hard to muster the motivation to practice it.

        >Have you tried the sequels?
        I emulate TGM1 and TGM2 Plus, and Texmaster when I want to play TGM3. But now I focus only on TGM1. I want to finish that game. And after I will practice until I can be GM.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is definitely not the worst 20G gameplay I've ever seen.

      TGM is a hard game. The first one being the easiest in the series doesn't detract from the fact that TGM is a hard game. Have you tried the sequels? Personally I like playing the original the least and I find it very hard to muster the motivation to practice it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Exaclty. GM in even the first game is a serious accomplishment.

        I'm kind of the opposite to you though anon. I find the original the most fun to play. I find that sonic drop in TAP kind of takes away from the fun of sub 20g in tgm1. Sonic drop just makes it feel like the first half of master is like a neutered 20g mode, if you know what I mean. In tgm1, you have to think a bit more in sub20g to avoid overhangs. Death mode is a different story, although I'm still kind of a noob there. Haven't been able to get M yet, but then again, I haven't practiced it that much. Trying to get a sub 10:30 in tgm1 before I move onto that.

        What do you like more about the sequels, or is it just that tgm1 is a bit too slow?

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not a Tetris expert, but there are a lot of differences between the games.
    As far as I know there are at least these "styles":

    - SEGA style, it introduced something called SEGA rotation, in which the pieces will rotate in a very specific way.

    - NES style, the one played on the Classic Tetris, this one is interesting because, before they discovered the techniques to make the game longer, every game basically had a "death screen". Essentially the pieces would fall so fast that a normal input wouldn't be able to make the pieces move, so only the truly best players, under a limited timer, would become a champion. You need to think really hard on where to place the pieces. The game is merciless, once the piece is placed it's placed. Recently, though, people have found a legit way to bypass the input limitation, leading to world records and that kid that broke the world record.

    - Tetris company style, this is a standardization of the Tetris after they won the rights of the series back. Basically every game released under the Tetris name must have a "bag", which guarantees that a certain piece will appear after a certain number of pieces among other rules and color pattern. This led for the game to be "solved", since it's very easy to break it thanks to bag system. There is an infamous Reddit thread of a guy basically proving that you can beat masters using a specific placement order thanks to that.

    - Tetris: The Grand Master, this is considered the most "hardcore" Tetris, it's super fast, it has a lot, the standard stuff introduced by the Tetris Company. The main difference is how the bag is handled, so it won't guarantee that you'll receive a piece after X pieces, thus the game is much more chaotic and you can't really solve it. The thing, though, is that the masters tend to create a "pyramid" placement layout, so the pieces will "slide" to the bottom. That's the only way to play at the higher levels.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also, I forgot to say, there are many more differences between them, small, but important differences. There are as many differences as, let's say between Stock car and Formula 1. They are both racing, each is has very specific specifications, rules and optimizations. All of them are good, but I would argue that we need a modernized version of NES. I believe that Tetris Effect has a mode with a modern version, it's not being used on championships though.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >it's not being used on championships though.
        Not even this one? https://youtu.be/OxsAkdS-0yk?si=Ufe5oFC5XB48aQAQ

        And I think that perhaps more games should try to replicate the Game Boy and SNES versions, especially since the objective is more so to steer clear of garbage pieces than to get higher scores, meaning there is less of a motivation to have to learn advanced techniques.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >especially since the objective is more so to steer clear of garbage pieces than to get higher scores, meaning there is less of a motivation to have to learn advanced techniques.
          What do you mean exactly?

          The Nintendo version of SNES is ugly, I don't know about Tengen though, since I've never played it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If the objective is to make sure one’s board doesn’t get filled up with “garbage” pieces and the game starts more slowly anyway, wouldn’t people be less likely to have to know these advanced techniques?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I don't know 1v1 on Tetr.io has garbage mechanics and people learn all kind of techniques to deal with that.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Including rolling and hypertapping?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Nintendo Tetris & Dr. Mario for SNES is identical of the NES one, it's basically the same game with minor differences, it uses the same input system. It gives you a little bit more space to turn the piece, I don't know about high level gameplay though.

                I thought you were talking about the techniques related to positioning of the pieces.

                Did you play these games? The input method is the same, basically.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's just a block matching game who the frick cares

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    kys youtubezoomer

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    On this console war spam board you have a culture of hipster gatekeeping, pseudo-intellectualism and console waring so it's the only place we're people would feel the need to say "Version x of tetris is far superior to Version Y". For the rest of the planet people will say "Tetris? I had it on my Gameboy/C64/NES/First family CPU"

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    no

    by the way, I'm not this anon:

    i have played the snes and genesis versions
    but didnt feel compelled to sink as much time into those
    for people with nostalgia towards them im sure theyre great too
    as for modern titles i havent played much besides the one on the switch tetris99

    I just answered you.

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Am I the only one who is thrown off by the multiple “next” boxes when playing “guideline Tetris”? Or have I been playing “classic Tetris” too much?

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    /thread
    OP seemed a bit dense, but this is the long and short of it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But do “classic Tetris” players ever play the GBC version or do they just stick to the SNES version and those that came before it?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        So is this basically it, then? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6S-MEmkuPB4&si=8x4xuA1tmqkiiHTy&t=9m10s

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes it's very different. Once you start playing at hayai speeds, you'll feel the difference. Old tetris is harder so props to the boomers that still play it. I just do a little tspin here and there.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So what are your feelings in regards to “Tetris DX” and “Tetris 64”? They seem to incorporate rules from both eras.

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