How do you feel about Guitar Hero before and right after it blew up in the mainstream?

How do you feel about Guitar Hero before and right after it blew up in the mainstream? Did you honestly expect Activision to milk them like they did? Did you enjoy the covers or the original songs more? Did you use the guitar or are you a controller type of guy?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I actually play guitar. I remember picking up the shitty guitartroller and I could play on the highest difficulty, without much problem. It was a novelty sure, but I never played it more than a few times. I had friends who loved it, but I just thought it was too gimmicky. You got these dudes who pretend to shred on a little toy guitar and idk, it was funny to see. I've heard they're are trying to teach people to play real guitar now... Doesn't seem like it's going well.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think the game could be better if it didn't have so much pop music. I think it's a Harmonix problem

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Wouldn’t say it’s suffocating like it would be later on. Some of the later guitar heroes were sounding like top 40s of the 2009 season they came out in. Which instantly killed them even for the pop loving public

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Dude, it had to be that way or it would have died the first go-round.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        People overestimate metal and rock in general you had fricking Opeth in a dumb Final Fight game these guys are cheap you could have even burzum and no one would give a shit

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Having worked in the music industry with licensing to these types of games before, some acts are ridiculously easy and cheap, while others are stingy and have a billion different stipulations to their licenses, what they're used for, etc.
          Some interesting examples I've come across are "lipsync/performance" rights being separate from song licensing, so having digitized avatars "performing" their songs in the game wasn't cheap, and sometimes forbidden. Other cases were cool with licensing tunes if other acts were not involved with the project (ex. Guns N Roses/Velvet Revolver, or Megadeth/Metallica. You could have one but not the other, or else there'd be trouble. Thankfully in the latter, RB2 got away with Peace Sells and Battery with no issues legally. GH3 was not so lucky. You'll notice RB got Chinese Democracy from GnR but the only reference to Velvet Revolver was a decade later in a Weird Al DLC song called My Own Eyes)
          And sometimes bands or specifically labels didn't want their stems leaking, so they wouldn't allow licensing the stemmed out audio at all (Led Zeppelin being a famous case of this, as well as Daft Punk, somewhat surprisingly. DJ Hero must've offered them absolute bank.)
          There are many more things that would change how easy a license is to get for a game like these. It's really crazy, actually.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Guitar Hero 2 is my favorite of the GH series. Back then, Harmonix really knew what they were doing when it came to sequels and polishing what worked.
    I didn't mind the covers, since it made it feel like your band was the one progressing through the career mode, and some songs like Psychobilly Freakout and Woman get extra guitar solos added in, which was great.
    The bonus setlists being mostly Harmonix in-house bands and their friends' bands really gave their games character, too. I was disappointed when Neversoft didn't follow through with that in Guitar Hero 3 as much as the first 2 (and 80s) GH titles. (Impulse was, though, and was my favorite song in GH3)
    Having grown up playing THPS, I expected Neversoft to milk the series, but we were also just on the edge of having DLC songs, since GH2 on Xbox 360 had some, and Rock Band was promising to keep the ball rolling on that, so I was honestly all in with them milking the shit out of it at first if it meant more songs to play. It also seemed like Guitar Hero was trying to innovate with new gameplay features moreso than Rock Band once they were both on the scene, which kept GH more exciting to watch out for, but Rock Band (esp 2) was the better quality series.
    GH felt like both the return of rock music and also the return of arcade styled games at the time, and I absolutely loved it for that. I played using the guitar controllers, which were made of Nintendium during the original two PS2 runs, and glass for every subsequent release.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'd played DDR, Freq, and Beatmania prior and thought it was fantastic. It was just as solid mechanically as the others, challenging when it wanted to be, and it was the first game of this kind you could play with girls and normies without them looking at you like a mutant. It set people up for Rock Band which was even better. Once normies got sick of it I was more or less burnt out on it too. RB and GH are tons more fun when you're tricking non-gamers into watching or playing along.
    >milking it
    was inevitable, but Activision/Neversoft GH was a marked stepdown from Harmonix's efforts. The timing windows were moronic-forgiving likely to cope for 2007 HDTV lag
    >the covers
    were good enough, but thankfully went away. I say that, but am slightly endeared by some of the flourishes and differences in the covers.
    >playing it without the guitar controller
    grim

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You know, I never really thought about why GH3 and on had such a huge timing window, besides the fact that the note charting was getting stupid, but accounting for HDTV lag makes a ton of sense actually.

      Dude, it had to be that way or it would have died the first go-round.

      I don't really get this sentiment, because GH1 felt like it was packed with tons of memorable guitar hits and spanned a lot of rock genres, and 2 felt like more of the same, with a helping of deeper cuts that the success of 1 afforded. I feel like the pop songs started happening more when vocals and drums came into the picture.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yeah and the lag calibration stuff didn't really work because while your strums would match the song, all the reactive SFX and visuals wouldn't be and it was weird.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Arguably the last hoorah for white music.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Rock roots aren't white

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I hate them because they clog up retro game stores (along with sports games). All you see are Guitar Hero copies and you'd be lucky to even find a guitar to play the damn game and even luckier to find one that's not broken.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >stores

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      God damn I wish. I got into it late and have been trying to buy all of the games for 360 and they're not as cheap or common as they used to be.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        they still look pretty cheap on ebay at a glance and clog up the used games at my local store

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not joking these games got me laid multiple times in college.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That final bracket in GHIII with Cliffs of Dover, Number of the Beast, One, and Raining Blood was fricking sick

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Always enjoyed them, and of course I expected them to be milked to death, including the Rock Band games. The money potential was too ridiculous, especially when DLC became popular. Cost of the song licenses aside, it's an extremely simple game that can't take long to design and code, paired with a plastic peripheral, selling for $80-100
    >Did you enjoy the covers or the original songs more?
    It ruined Ziggy Stardust for me. I always expect the solo to come but it's not in the original song

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    too mainstream by the third game i hated it. but 2 was pure kino still is

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got to play it in Highschool and it helped me seem more cool to normies when I was able to 5 star TTFAF on expert so there was that.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like them but have trouble going back and enjoying them because of the limited music library

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got pretty good at them and was the best in my school. I played real guitar for a few years but I haven’t played in quite a while. I also played Clone Hero but the stupid controller I bought stopped working. TDWDTG is probably the hardest official song in the franchise.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I love rhythm games in general so its sad that GH and RB wringed the genre dry with the later games so no more rhythm games have been made since like 2011 (other than the weird GH reboot from years ago)

    I find the early games fun but good luck finding a functioning controller to play it on. I like Clone Hero, thats pretty fun when you load it with all the songs from all the GH and RB games. I find Rockband's music selection to be a lot more varied though, it got me into bands I wouldn't have found otherwise.

    also I quite liked DJ hero 2, weirdly. Not my type of music and clearly a cash in but I had fun with it

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Small correction though, Rock Band 4 also came out around the time of the Guitar Hero reboot, and was supported until literally a few days ago. They also put out a new Amplitude, and then Fortnite Festival is basically Rock Band 5 if you're so inclined. It's even getting new peripherals sometime this year and a compatibility mode for RB instruments, which is weird to say.
      Also, if you like Clone Hero, check out YARG (Yet Another Rhythm Game), because it comes with a kick-ass built in setlist, and also supports vocals and pro-modes from RB3. Also looks more like RB, which I prefer, and they're working on background venues and stuff too.
      DJ Hero was surprisingly awesome and a unique take on the formula. I really liked the idea of mashing up two songs for the setlist.

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