>no additional hardware, literally just an SNES with a CD drive

>no additional hardware, literally just an SNES with a CD drive
So how would this have worked? Would the library have just consisted of regular SNES games with CD audio and FMVs, or would Nintendo/Sony have introduced special carts designed to run alongside CD games that required add-on chips, like for example a Super FX boot cartridge?

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  1. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Electricity, likely

  2. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    At the time, it probably would have been more of the former. FMVs and CD audio. Additional space on the disc probably would have been used for more sprite storage and stuff like that.
    If the system came out and performed well, it may have been used more like your second example if they hadn't moved onto a successor system that would probably have had 3d capabilities built in, opposed to having something like the SuperFX chip.

  3. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    I'm pretty sure the PCE CD-ROM unit had no special hardware at all and was just a regular CD player, they expanded it's capabilites through various system cards

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      This. When the disk drive was in use, the cart slot would probably be used for memory expansion like the PC Engine and Saturn did with theirs.

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      exactly this, a drive and RAM to hold data loaded from disc

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      The cards literally gave it more RAM.

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      >How would the future pan out in my imaginary alternate history?
      Nobody knows. Although I'm sure some save snes superdisc schizo has all the details.

      Why would be you pretty sure of something you know nothing about and are completely wrong about? Why are zoomies like this?

      • 7 days ago
        Anonymous

        Refute it then instead of crying about le zoomer boogeyman. gays like you are so tiresome

        • 7 days ago
          Anonymous

          >zoomie bullshits on the internet
          >zoome gets called out for bullshiting on the internet
          >zoomie throws a trantrum
          Many such cases. Zoomies like you are tiresome.

          SNES could have had King of Fighters 94 and shit. Definitely adding some very attractive titles at the time, not to mention unquestionable superiority over Sega ports.

          All kinds of stuff could have been done with it. If you look at the massive impact CD had on the PCE it's easy to imagine that Nintendo could reproduce those results. But that's not what OP asked.

          • 7 days ago
            Anonymous

            >Still can't contribute anything but mindless screeching about "zoomies"
            You're definitely some newbie Ganker import trying too hard to fit in

            • 7 days ago
              Anonymous

              All you've "contributed" is bullshit, cope, and projecting.
              You will immediately cease and not continue to access the site if you are under the age of 18.

              • 7 days ago
                Anonymous

                >Begging me to stop replying
                Keep seething and try again, you'll get there

      • 7 days ago
        Anonymous

        SNES could have had King of Fighters 94 and shit. Definitely adding some very attractive titles at the time, not to mention unquestionable superiority over Sega ports.

        • 7 days ago
          Anonymous

          >SNES could have had King of Fighters 94 and shit.
          complete nonsense. the snes was nowhere near as capable as you imagine it is.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            There were no tricks in KoF that SSF2 didn't have. There would be brief round loading but its not as bad as Saturn.

  4. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    FMVs and CD audio were the standard at that time for disc games. There was only so much these consoles could store in RAM so it's not like they could just add a bunch of animation frames or whatever, every area would have the same amount of graphics as a stock SNES.

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      >FMVs and CD audio were the standard at that time for disc games.
      Not least because writing 250+ MB of actual game code with 1991-1992-era dev tools would've been a fricking miserable experience.

      • 7 days ago
        Anonymous

        >Not least because writing 250+ MB of actual game code with
        what? the typical 5th gen game had about 16MB worth of code.

  5. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    My guess is it was basically an iteration on the Famicom Disk System idea. Plug RAM cart into it for more demanding 3D games like what the Sega CD did.

  6. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    I mean CDs at the time were basically bbc compared to a SNES cartridge. Just the fact that it could hold so much was all the features it needed. Fmvs were badass. I mean it looked great against VHS tapes

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      > I mean it looked great against VHS tapes

      Maybe in CDI, because Sega's MegaCD looked like grainy crap, unless it was a 32X enhanced cd version

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      >cds at the time were basically bbc compared to a snes cartridge
      Please never post again.

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      >cds were a meme format that were easily broken and scratched, degrade over time, took too long to load and are now completely irrelevant
      sounds about right

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >were basically bbc
      You have gay brain and it's disgusting.

  7. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Anime cinemas done with 2D graphics (not FMV) on PCE and Sega CD are absolute K I N O

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous
  8. 7 days ago
    Anonymous
  9. 7 days ago
    Anonymous
  10. 7 days ago
    Anonymous
  11. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    It was a PS1 prototype, so it was mainly used to play disc games. The cartridge slot would have been used for memory. But once the deal between Sony and Nintendo broke, Sony decided to turn the Nintendo Playstation into just the Playstation.

  12. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    You use the CD space to finish the scrubbed background details in games like Final Fight.

  13. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    >Would the library have just consisted of regular SNES games with CD audio and FMVs
    nah. just audio and data.
    > or would Nintendo/Sony have introduced special carts designed to run alongside CD games that required add-on chips,
    superfx was designed for carts. sony and nintendo's idea was just to use a stock snes. there would have been no superfx support in the machine itself so CD games would just be like any other snes cart, except larger and extremely slow loading

  14. 7 days ago
    Anonymous

    Ban "what if" threads.

    • 7 days ago
      Anonymous

      ...why?

      • 7 days ago
        Anonymous

        Because none of them are good, and we don't need another hundred variants of "could Nintendo have saved the Saturn?".

        • 7 days ago
          Anonymous

          But OP's talking about the technical specifications of an actual physical product, not alternate futures.

          • 7 days ago
            Anonymous

            There was no actual physical product though, he's asking for nothing but speculation.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      ...why?

      or just contain them to "(company) what if generals", a whatif every once in a while can be entertaining if anything to see zoomies larping about shit as if they were born back then, but the constant spam with little variations is tiresome

      https://i.imgur.com/a0IaG3b.jpeg

      >no additional hardware, literally just an SNES with a CD drive
      So how would this have worked? Would the library have just consisted of regular SNES games with CD audio and FMVs, or would Nintendo/Sony have introduced special carts designed to run alongside CD games that required add-on chips, like for example a Super FX boot cartridge?

      >So how would this have worked?
      Anon there were to be two potential products, something like a sega cd but the snes, and the nintendo playstation which is what you see on the picture and was something sony was gearing more towards full multimedia. Everything is well documented and accessible if you bother to search the board archives or even a web search.

      There was no actual physical product though, he's asking for nothing but speculation.

      wtf what you see on that picture was intended to be an actual physical product....

      For the Playstation Ken Kutaragi wanted $7.50 in royalties.

      Nintendo were $19. But for the Snes-Play-Station, Sony wanted $21 more than Nintendo!

      imagine the price of games!
      Crash Bandicoot at $74 instead of $42!

      what an stupid comparison ffs, sony wanted something like equal royalties for the snes cd and even more from the nintendo playstation. What you see in that picrel is the result of a company intent in assaulting Nintendo's empire, not out of mere goodwill towards studios and end users..

  15. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    >So how would this have worked? Would the library have just consisted of regular SNES games with CD audio and FMVs

    Pretty much. I always used to think about what could have been in regards to this thing... until I heard about how it contained basically no additional features or enhancements whatsoever like the SegaCD had and was literally just a CD in place of a cartridge. Even the FDS at least added more sound channels to the Famicom. If anything, this would have held the SNES back because there would be no feasible option for expansion chips. Come to think of it, how would you even save? You would either have to rely on passwords (have fun with THAT for RPGs...) or have a cart that is basically a memory card like the SegaCD had.... even though the SegaCD also had internal SRAM for saving.

    >or would Nintendo/Sony have introduced special carts designed to run alongside CD games that required add-on chips, like for example a Super FX boot cartridge?

    Highly doubt it, that would be a total mess. It would be copying the 32X of all things, but multiple times over. Some games had custom chips that very few used like Megaman X2/3 or Far East of Eden Zero. The SNES had a slew of different enhancement chips, you would have to have made multiple such carts, it would be a mess and completely unfeasible to do so. Imagine a a kid buying or being gifted a CD game and being told you have to plug in the "Super FX Cart" when you boot it up, and then having to save up/beg your parents to go buy that cart, then some time later you get another CD game and are told you need to plug in the "Super SA Cart".

    The other option would be to either make games that only use the base SNES hardware (which would have cut out many of it's later most memorable games) or have a single expansion cart and make every game only be able to use that regardless if it would work for the game or not (and if you are using up a cart for expansion chips, then again, how will you save your game?).

  16. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    For the Playstation Ken Kutaragi wanted $7.50 in royalties.

    Nintendo were $19. But for the Snes-Play-Station, Sony wanted $21 more than Nintendo!

    imagine the price of games!
    Crash Bandicoot at $74 instead of $42!

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      >imagine the price of games!
      >Crash Bandicoot at $74 instead of $42!

      Crash, or any PS1 game, would have never ran on the SNES CD addon. It only let the SNES read from a CD in place of a cart, it did not add any additional hardware.

      Other than having a CD drive and the similar name there was nothing TO copy or adapt over to a standalone console from it.

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