>Sega gets conned into buying a load of snake oil 3D chips from Samsung

>Sega gets conned into buying a load of snake oil 3D chips from Samsung
>the things run too hard for the process used, get hot, and shit themselves
>some Hitachi engineers decap one and are like "Yo what kind of chimpanzees designed this thing?"
>the chips also get delayed and Sega has to cancel several games meant to use them so they only ever end up in Virtua Racing
#JustSegaThings

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Thanks for the twitter post

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      get with the times, it's X now
      also nobody has unironically used hashtags in bare mininum seven years

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that was unironic? How can you tell

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The sonic fanbase is preparing an army to scout every inch of the planet to find the prototype of STH3D

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >The sonic fanbase is preparing an army to scout every inch of the planet to find the prototype of STH3D
      Doesn't actually exist. That idea was scrapped before any programming work was done.
      It'd be like attempting to find a Sonic 2 prototype with Genocide City Zone or Dust Hill Zone in it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Reminds me of when people had to be told that the SatAM game concept animation that was less than a minute long was... a CONCEPT ANIMATION and there was not a single line of game code to leak. Doesn't help that many idiots on their websites or YouTube channels claimed it was a "never released game". I guess that is technically true if you count games that literally never even started development as "never released". This is no Star Fox 2 or Dinosaur Planet.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the prototype of what?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sonic The Hedgehog 3D, the original 3rd entry in the series that was planned to be a 3D game on the Genesis using the SVP, but due to chip shortage Sonic Team had to cancel it and thus worked on the Sonic 3 we know.

        >The sonic fanbase is preparing an army to scout every inch of the planet to find the prototype of STH3D
        Doesn't actually exist. That idea was scrapped before any programming work was done.
        It'd be like attempting to find a Sonic 2 prototype with Genocide City Zone or Dust Hill Zone in it.

        >Doesn't actually exist
        Is there a confirmation?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Doesn't even fucking exist!

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Source?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    —"SNES could only do good graphics with special chips!"
    —"then why didn't Sega use them?"
    —"…"

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I heard the return rate, because of malfunction, on these was much higher than average.
    I was also told that at some point Sega informed stores that they were not supposed to keep this game running in the demo booths for too long due to risk of breakage.
    Samsung fucked them over bigtime and Sega had yet another mismanagement on their hand.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I feel like that fuckup might've been costlier for Sega than it seems at first glance.
      Had the SVP functioned as expected and been delivered on time, there's a chance Sega might've created a passthrough cart for it. Which might've eliminated the desire to create the 32X.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The SVP ran at something like 25Mhz but that was too much for the process used so it just overheated and cooked itself. It might have been ok if they heat sinked it but...

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >It might have been ok if they heat sinked it but...
      The SVP did have a heatsink and thermal paste.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >The SVP did have a heatsink and thermal paste.
        And it did fuckall, thing still popped out of solder points due to thermal expansion. Or straight-up melted.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          the problem is more like it was clocked too high which would cause electron migration. this would not be solved by a heat sink. overclocking an IC beyond its design limits is a bad idea.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Samsung clocked it that high in order to hit the numbers they had initially promised in their proposal, within the price envelope they had agreed upon. But that was because their original proposal was a shitty lowball.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It works just like an electrical cord that is undersized for the voltage fed through it. The wire will melt and break. Thus forcing too much voltage through a chip's innards will cause the interconnects to melt and break. Electron migration has become an area of increased concern with newer and progressively smaller process nodes while it wasn't really a big problem back when ICs were 5 or 3 ums due to the large dies and greater amount of material in them.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This could be why they rejected SGI's pitch for 3D chips after getting burned with these things. They didn't trust anyone but their buddies at Hitachi to get the job done.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    3D was really new at the time and difficult to figure out, a lot of the early attempts bombed spectacularly. The PS1 only succeeded because Sony had built an experimental 3D workstation back in the late '80s and were able to build off that technology.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Sony had built an experimental 3D workstation back in the late '80s and were able to build off that technology.

      Wait, what? Info on this?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think he's talking about System-G, the prototype that later became the DME-9000. Kutaragi wanted to create a game console with 3D graphics that good after seeing it. The early Sony Playstation dev kits were modified NEWS workstations that were likely based on it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The SVP, in the rare occasions when it worked without a hitch, was an actually capable chip. Its problem was the ridiculously sloppy hackjob Samsung did when designing it, leading to its unreliability. Also they may have pulled a bait & switch, since apparently there seems to be an early spec sketch which mentions a PCM with 2 extra sound channels, that doesn't exist in the final product.
      The only reason Sega went with Samsung is because they a) lowballed the initial request for proposal; b) heavily booze & hookers-ed the Sega delegation that went to Korea.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        it was like the first Famicom and SNES chipsets, Ricoh slapped them together in a hurry to get the things on the shelves and they had major issues that took a couple revisions to fix

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Unfortunately, unlike Nintendo, Sega were dumb enough (or drunk enough, given what we know of Samsung's corporate party) to place a single bulk (non-batched) order for several hundred thousand pieces (AFAIK, Nintendo had the foresight to order their chips in batches, so if bugs were detected in a batch, further delivery would be stopped until issues were fixed). Meaning all the SVP chips they received were borked, with no way of correcting that in an economically-feasible manner.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          dese fookin SHVC SNESes. yeah the chips are shit and also have a couple hardware bugs such as a non-working DMA controller.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            posting the same old pic, eh?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            buy the first version of any new hardware and you'll probably have issues. you're volunteering to be the manufacturer's unpaid guinea pig.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Its problem was the ridiculously sloppy hackjob Samsung did when designing it, leading to its unreliability
        As one Sega engineer explained, the die was extremely dense for the process used (not sure what node it was, maybe 2 um?) and also had a very thin metallization layer to maximize the operating speed. So its 25Mhz internal speed was too much for it and it overheated and melted itself.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I think they could have gotten it working reliably with some more time and effort. Sega also snubbed SGI's chipset as it was an unproven beta design and not ready for mass production yet.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Source?

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the one MD game that can't be emulated or even played on hardware because the chip is faulty

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The MD version has been emulated on Kega Fusion for a while now, and more recently on the Genesis Mini 2. No idea how accurate either is with that particular game but certainly playable.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe back in the 2000s, but the game emulates just fine nowadays.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    one wonders how Sega even managed to stay in business at all with these kind of product decisions

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      no one does, anon. no one does.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    People love that game, what's really your problem?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      they are wrong to do so

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    could they not have put the expensive chips in a lock-on cartridge instead of individual cartridges?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They did. It's called a 32x. Clearly your brilliant idea was a smashing success.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do you know that the chips were from Samsung rather than NEC, Fujitsu, or Amstrad

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Because they were. It is just a matter of fact.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He spent the 30 seconds educating himself that you're too lazy to

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