Video games, in comparison to literature, have an eroding effect on the imagination.

Video games, in comparison to literature, have an eroding effect on the imagination.

The book demands that the reader exercise their imagination to render the story. The video game does that work for you, and so the imagination atrophies. Some games (ASCII based roguelikes) are an exception to this, but they are the extreme minority.

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Agreed. I think aphantasia isn't real.. imagination is like a muscle you must train and sadly too many these days are left with nothing to imagine when all the imagery is already made for them in their movies and videogames.

    Whats worse is that every movie and game is infested with 'acting' now, consumers have forgetten how other people really sound when things are really happening and they're not pretending.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I think aphantasia isn't real
      This is definitely true. I thought for a long time that I couldn't visualize until I started to read books again as an adult. Gradually I began to see imagery in my mind again. First cloudy and almost imperceptible, but increasingly more vivid as I continued to read. It made me remember very early childhood memories that I had completely forgotten. My ability to visualize was lost directly in proportion to my growing obsession with games as a child, and it happened so young that I forgot that I ever had the ability at all.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The book demands that the reader exercise their imagination to render the story. The video game does that work for you, and so the imagination atrophies.

    So we're just ignoring Minecraft, Terraria, Dragon Quest Builders, Animal Crossing, Tears of the Kingdom, and every other game that encourages you to use your imagination?

    What am I saying? This is Ganker. Ignoring everything that inconveniently refutes what you're saying is the norm here.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You know, it's actually really pathetic to do that. You don't like being wrong, do you? Because being wrong means you're not perfect. And the idea that you're not perfect is like a white-hot dagger in the heart. I know your type. You'll tear the flesh off your bones with your bare hands if it means you don't have to admit that you're wrong. Anything to protect your fragile ego. I bet you're not even going to read this because I'm not kissing your ass and blindly agreeing with you.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There is something in minecraft that can utilize imagination during the earlier conceptual stages of a build, and it is certainly a creative game, but it's probably 20% imagination and 80% engineering. By engineering, I mean the part of the brain that is exercised when you do something like woodworking or building a house. It is creative but it is not imaginative.

      There's a very important distinction between the two and they are not at all the same.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >There's a very important distinction between the two and they are not at all the same.

        Please explain how they aren't the same, because you aren't making a lick of sense.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Imagination has a magical, schizophrenic quality to it. You're seeing things that do not exist inside of your mind. That is fundamentally very different from building Legos or minecraft, which are creative activities. With those activities, you use blocks which are seen with the eyes and exist in reality and you push them together until they form a structure.

          I said that minecraft may use 20% of your imagination because if you initially have some vision for what you want to construct then that vision may be something you are using your imagination to generate. I have seen people who do entire builds based on reference images though, so in those cases they are barely using their imagination at all.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP is talking about visual imagination, I assume. Not like, the imagination needed to build something. The visuals are provided to you in those games.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        One must visualize what they wish to build in the cases of Minecraft and Terraria. There isn’t always some blueprint one can take from. So ultimately it relies on the vision of the individual.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably true.
    But I mean if you wanted to you could put in extra effort to fill in the gaps and everything like you're playing a 2d RPG, put in the effort to imagine it in a 3D realistic world with all the detail that's missing.
    I dunno. I don't do that, it'd be way too distracting, but it's something you could do I guess.

    As for 3D games, yeah you're pretty much correct in that case.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I remember games and movies increasing my imagination. I think the problem nowadays is that kids don't play pretend anymore, they barely leave the house.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I think the problem nowadays is that kids don't play pretend anymore
      I agree with that, but I think there is something about games that specifically disincentivize playing pretend. I remember that when I was a child I used to play pretend when I played Spyro or Ocarina of Time. I would pretend that the game had complexity that it didn't have, I'd pretend that Spyro was really living in that world and that it wasn't just a 3d platformer, I'd pretend and anticipate all sorts of beautiful and awe inspiring things when Link would go into a new dungeon. I was always brought back down to reality though because what it just wasn't true at all and thinking that kind of stuff just makes you worse at the game. You're seeing what you wish it was and not what it is. It reminds me of the whole school yard legends about mew under the truck in pokemon red. How much time did they waste running around that truck? Never would happen today.

      As games have progressed and becoming increasingly realistic looking, increasingly less confusing and more obvious, etc, it has thoroughly squashed even the few routes where a trickle of imagination could have found its way in.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I still use random objects to play while my games are loading or I'm grinding something. I have two toothbrushes I use to play with and imagine there's a sword fight going on, or use one of them as a sword and the other as an arm holding it.
    It's weird, but I like to think it means the wild imagination I had during my childhood is still around.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stealth rouguelike games aren't shit thread. I was about to actually type out and opinion but I see you homosexual.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on the book to evoke imagination, therefore, it also depends on the videogame to do the same. An inexperienced writer will create only exposition and literal descriptions. The same can be said of most game developers- they will create intricate systems but only allow the player to act within them. Games that have "emergent gameplay"- such as simulation games and sandbox games- might be what you are after. You may be fond of titles such as Dwarf Fortress already, given that you enjoy classical roguelikes.

    I do not think comparing videogames to literature is a fair comparison. I feel it is better to compare them to a stage play, where the audience is on the stage with the actors.. The playwright is faced with a choice: they can either provide the audience an easily digestible, yet rigid script they must follow- or they could treat the experience as an improv session, and let the audience create their own story.

    To be blunt: I see that the fault is not in the medium, rather, it lies in the creators. Videogames are primarily a for-profit industry- and thus, they must be made easily accessible so the studios that make them can return a profit. It is not in their monetary interest to stimulate the imagination. You will only see such works in passion projects and indie circles.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think all media mediums have their place, a book is great for imagination in thinking up of images and story situations, but video game allow you to actually act upon them and come up with your own solutions(well the good ones atleast) they also assist in imagination just a more physical action based imagination.
    The real pedestrian media is movies/TV as there's no room for active or passive imagination

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What about text adventure games?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's literally just a choose your own adventure book but on a screen

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The video game does that work for you
    Some videogames have more depth obviously why am I even responding to this bait. Anyway sometimes there are enough easter eggs to put together a subplot or an alternative plot to the one you've been spoon fed. I like those kinda games.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If video games erode the imagination then movies rape your brain.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Books are the most degenerate things the world has ever seen.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nah, you either have an imagination or your don’t. Games inspire all sorts of creativity from me because I’m a naturally creative person.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is it really the fault of imagination or having 0 attention span?

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Being a wageslave is doing a better work at killing my imagination but you aren't telling me to drop my job, wienersucker.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Zambia really knows how to weed them out wow
      Are they striving for Plato's republic

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Black Souls is another exception, so are Obra Dinn, Outer Wilds and other metroidbrainias, because I hope you don't understand imagination as something purely visual. The player having to exercise their imagination to render the story is a perfect description for them. Doing mental cartography with all the pieces of information you find, then filling the gaps yourself, while minding that it doesn't contradict itself, knowing that every new discovery might flip everything you thought you knew on its head... I'd argue they do a better job at exercising the imagination than most literature, which is just pasively imagining the words your brain registers, most often aided with detailed descriptions, while in those games you have to imagine entire chains of events, characters' thoughts and boundries, reasons why they're even happening.
    But tbh movies are to blame the most in this situation. And not just for dumb reasons like seeing the scenes in a movie will affect how you imagine them when you're reading the book, but because adaptations are required to make cuts to sub-plots or even the main plot, cheapening the whole story. Games don't have that problem.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >complete basic b***h moron #967,902,128,075 reads Blood Meridian and imagines he's an intellectual titan

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    People made the same argument about the transition from oration to the written word. Or how giving the masses their own bibles to read would corrupt their faith etc

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Or how giving the masses their own bibles to read would corrupt their faith
      That was to prevent heresions. Before that Church had a monopoly on interpreting the bible.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        heresies*

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I disagree with everything except the aphantasia thing. Saying you have aphantasia is admitting you are a soulless automaton cuck with no use to humanity beyond that of a mule.

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