Were games straight up telling you to cheat a common occurrence?

Were games straight up telling you to cheat a common occurrence?

Schizophrenic Conspiracy Theorist Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

Schizophrenic Conspiracy Theorist Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >SaGa
    I feel like that game is an outlier when it comes to literally everything

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Funnily, a lot of things SaGa did became common JRPG mechanics, symbol encounter and menu-based map movement being two big ones.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It also directly inspired evolution in pokemon

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >restoring a save is cheating

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I kind of wonder if this protip was in the Japanese manual.
      If reloading upon a character's death was an intended way of playing the game, why would the devs add such a failure state to begin with?
      Why not just allow you to continuously revive them?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think it's to train the player to save often. Yeah you can reset but then you have to do everything all over again, you gotta weigh your options. I've never played SaGa but if it's a game where you can only save in town that can make it a tough choice.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I doubt it
        It's an imitation of old D&D, where being raised from death would permanently reduce your constitution stat by 1.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          (And obviously you're eventually going to hit zero and be permadead or you'll retire that character because constitution penalties cripple them)

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I kind of wonder if this protip was in the Japanese manual.
        It's not. In fact that whole page doesn't exist in that form. The Japanese manual mentions hearts are used for reviving, and mentions revival shops existing in towns, but it doesn't have a page explaining the revive interface.
        I did notice a couple of relevant things though. The last page of the Japanese manual is a hints page, one of which is "you can save anywhere in this game so save frequently 'cause you don't know what dangers await you." The other thing is that new hearts can be bought with money (10,000 kero). I don't remember hearts even being much of an issue when I actually played the game (though I remember finding the concept of limited revival itself pretty old-school even when the game was new) but I guess later when you're rich you can also make it irrelevant with the power of money.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          10k is a lot of money for a lot of the game, at least to invest into something that really doesn't advance your character. Potions to raise your humans don't really become feasible to mass consume until after you beat the first world due to how little gold you get from most monsters there.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you've never played any real RPGs, bro. save scumming, especially in early RPGs, if the way you play the game. But go ahead, play wizardry without save scumming and tell me how much fun you have

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's an additional price to reviving characters, which makes you take character death more seriously. You can reload and replay the last bit or you can restart the entire game if you are so obliged. The game's not supposed to hold your family hostage. The point is, character death is SaGa is a bigger deal than the same in FF or DQ.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Start em savescumming young, I say

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Savescumming is when you keep a copy of a save file in a game that automatically updates or deletes saves. Reloading after failure is not called savescumming.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I thought save scumming was when you save and keep reloading until you do it, saving at all steps to make sure you never suffer consequences due to your mistakes and do a pefect run through it...

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Have your party follow the lost warrior in death through ritualistic group suicide and then you're just loading after a tragic game over and not save scumming.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Lufia II came with a big manual that solved a lot of the puzzles for you. Maybe all of them, I don't remember.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This version. 76 pages of glossy paper and a nice big sturdy box so it could fit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Then there's Earthbound, the game that came with it's own official strategy guide from Nintendo Power since they knew full well no one was gonna figure out the password to Belch's base. I remember renting EB twice as a kid before I got my own copy, and both times all three save slots had people sitting in Saturn Village who clearly couldn't go any further.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Two times, first time, and another time where I had completely forgotten about it, I solved it by pure accident lol. Probably was the way it was meant to be done

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This version. 76 pages of glossy paper and a nice big sturdy box so it could fit.

      That's just how every single console RPG was released up until the mid 90's. This shit is probably even one of the main reasons why so many publishers were reluctant to releasing RPGs.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      pic related

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The manual for Chulip has a full guide complete with maps.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what the heck is this? looks interesting

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        2k kissing simulator.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Crow: City of Angels is notoriously hard withiot an invincibility cheat. You are actually supposed to use it. The character is invincible in the movie until the bad guy kills the crow that gave him superpowers. When the same thing happens in the game, the cheat stops working.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    EVO Search for Eden kinda hinted at you being able to abuse the "evolve cheap part - get all HP back" quirk even in the Japanese manual.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    they were just giving the gaijin a crutch anon, they're bad at video games

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >words mean what i imagine they mean
    funfact: This is one of the 7 mantras more popular with zoomie than om. Tap here to learn more

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Shut the frick up

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I accept your concession

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Speed-runners have fricked yalls brains up.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I wouldn't go as far as calling that "cheating" at all, OP. Also, it was quite common for manuals back then to give tricks and tips, I miss manuals by the way, they felt like a map to the treasure.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not sure if other region manuals mention this or not, but Altered Beast's manual tells you how to continue in the Tips section.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This was common place with hidden continue functions and I wouldn't really call that a cheat. It's just that it was a transition period for console games that mimicked the arcade, and button combinations with no prompt to continue was the best thing they could come up with to mimic the idea of inserting another coin in the machine, and this was standard for a while for many console games; and in vast majority of cases it's always hold a button and press start.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Tips and tricks used to be cool before you could find them all online.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Reading comprehension, OP. The article is telling you to revert to an older save - which, it says, you have hopefully kept - and replay from there if you've played yourself into a corner.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *