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What's /tg opinion on Kult Divinity Lost?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Love it. Enjoy it as a kitchen sink horror setting that is good about not watering itself down and has some fun ideas and concepts. Played a few games and everyone really liked it.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Don't really have one.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    reviews and videos about it seemed cool, rare as they are to find, but there was something about needed to find the special edition if you didn't want censored art and content?
    and then instead of doing more research I just gave up

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Love the lore and aesthetic, don't like the system. I take ideas from it and put it into Call of Cthulhu. The rules are light enough anyway so might as well just use your favourite system

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What's wrong with mechanic?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        My problems with them are more about PbtA in general rather than specifically Kult: Divinity Lost. To start, a lot of the parlance used such as 'moves' and 'playbooks' make it feel too gamey than led to me losing immersion in the atmosphere, which might work in other games but is a major no-no in a horror game.
        ''I try to sneak up on the cultists and try to eavesdrop on their meeting'' feels like a character describing their actions
        ''I use the PIERCE THE VEIL move to DISPELL THE ILLUSION and then use my COOL stat to do 2 HARM'' feels like someone describing their Magic the Gathering turn.
        I'll admit that these are problems that can be fixed with modification (could get rid of moves/playbooks altogether and just make every roll with the relevant stat) and good player/GM roleplay but as it's written it's clear that the way I view RPGs differ very heavily from the way the designers do. Not saying either are better or worse, just a difference in philosophy

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That's actually backwards. PbtA are games where you must describe what you are doing, ando that might trigger a move or not. With emphasis on not always. That's they have the principle of "fiction first".

          If the GM remembers the moves, he might just tell to roll a certain stat and go from there. Not naming the move.

          You need to describe first and then the GM might allow for a move, or not.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That may have been the intention but after running a few sessions I found that the players were looking at their playbooks to determine what to do rather than the other way around. I really think the issue is in the presentation and the wording used because I haven't had this issue in Call of Cthulhu or Delta Green despite those being more rules heavy games. The words playbook and moves evokes the image of a full on game and the player having something labelled as a playbook with a list of options they could be led to believe these are the only options available to them. I actually don't mind the game mechanics themselves and think they're a great entry-level game but if I were to run it again I'd make a few modifications, most importantly I'd remove the concepts of playbooks and named moves entirely. Have they characters describe their actions, tell them which stat to roll and go from there (which is what the moves are supposed to be like anyway if I'm understanding it right). Same result but removes the boardgamey mindset that cropped up in my experience with the system as written

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like it a lot but I find it difficult to figure out what game I would run in it and I don't think I would be able to get it to the table with any group I've played with.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I find it difficult to figure out what game I would run in it

      Didn't read a lot of 90s Vertigo comics, did you?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm afraid not I was a wee baby at that time. So play it like it Hellraiser? I still feel like I need

        Interesting ideas but I can’t see how you make it into a campaign unless you have a group of Clive barker fans already.

        >you’ve been marked by the demonic BDSM body horror angels wat do

        's Clive Barker fans to play it. Most groups would probably never be comfortable playing with me again if I pitch the torture hell realms the way the game wants me to.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think you should buy an ad

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      sorry for sliding a space marines general off the catalog

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        kek
        keep making such threads anon, 40k/dnd spam is tiresome

        https://i.imgur.com/KyEx4VL.jpeg

        What's /tg opinion on Kult Divinity Lost?

        I don't like it, gnostic ideas are interesting but I feel they are not described in detail and left too much into interpretation. If you have a unique setting and an rpg that has that setting on focus, then you really should lore dump as much as possible and allow freedom in selective places. Old World of Darkness did this very well imho, maybe too much since later on there was a metaplot bloat (but v20 fixed that, anyways). When you read 2nd or Revised/3rd edition corebook of vtm you would more or less get an excellent grip on what is going on. Who is Camarilla who is Sabbat, what are their goals, what clans do, how is the mortal relations and so forth. With Kult I mean.. meh, there are some general concepts, Archons and stuff and humans have potential but I felt they were way too vague. Again comparing it to VtM you basically knew what young vampries could do and what could they become.
        Kult is lacking, thats what I want to say in my rambling.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've NEVER played it. I grabbed a book when I had money and no time for games, but never found a place for it or tried it.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Interesting ideas but I can’t see how you make it into a campaign unless you have a group of Clive barker fans already.

    >you’ve been marked by the demonic BDSM body horror angels wat do

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is one of those interesting games that I doubt anyone will ever play. The central gimmick of being enlightened by madness is very poorly explained, and I can't figure out how to fricking do magic.
    The modules are something else, though. The one where you're the horsemen of the apocalypse is crazy enough to be fun.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There's this Kult "universe" book, anyone read it ? Any good? It's funny because it's published by Free League.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Well, the art is great and the setting quite unique.

    PbtA is a special thing though since Apocalypse World was so cool and fresh but then everyone wanted a shot at it without necessarily understanding it.
    It's what happened here. PbtA is supposed to be simple because it's unclutered. For Kult they raised the core stat from 5 to 10 so it would match the Archons numbers. And now as a player you're constantly looking at your sheet and as a GM you're trying to remember all these Moves so you won't miss one when a player tries is best to not ruin the atmosphere by not spelling it out to you.

    Also the first editions of Kult featured a Sanity system where you could disconnect from Humanity either by becoming more and more monstruous but also and quite cheekily by becoming more virtuous. As you slowly ascend to Godhood it's hard to keep tabs on friends and family or even eating or sleeping. You're outcasting yourself but do you even care at that point?
    They get ride of that for a really classic "you're losing it" and that's a waste.

    As far as I'm concerned this edition didn't keep its promises. Never tried to run it and when I'll eventualy do I'll just use Trophy Dark's rules I guess.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Also the first editions of Kult featured a Sanity system where you could disconnect from Humanity either by becoming more and more monstruous but also and quite cheekily by becoming more virtuous. As you slowly ascend to Godhood it's hard to keep tabs on friends and family or even eating or sleeping. You're outcasting yourself but do you even care at that point?
      Can you talk a little more about this? I like Sanity systems in games but they do have a tendency to act like a spiral and it's all very homogenous. I like creativity in the insanity.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        RPG Pundit have a quite thoughtful system in The Invisible College where he really digged into what insanity implies and how it can manifest without removing away player agency. In a magical setting like his own game or Kult one of the outcomes might be ego tripping to the point you consider non-awaken characters as cattle or pawns.

        Kult's first editions go the same way but not really naming it. Anyway:
        -Sanity bar starts at midpoint for normies.
        -You go down and starts to have mild effects like pets hating you. It's also easier to pierce the veil and you gain some magical powers. At the extreme you're a psychopath and demons get to boss you around.
        -You go up and starts to have mild effect like birds resting on you. It's also easier to pierce the veil and you gain some magical powers. At the extreme you're a living buddha with no attachment to anyone or anything and get to dispel demons at will.

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