Which system is good to play plucky peasant heroes without combat experience, going in heroic adventures?

Which system is good to play plucky peasant heroes without combat experience, going in heroic adventures?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OSE / BX

    • 2 months ago
      Smaugchad

      Ryuutama.

      F2PBPs

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ryuutama.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't it more for le grimdark blood and guts type game?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Ryuutama
        >grimdark
        Are you retarded, or just starved for attention?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Ryuutama is a fucking Ghibli-Movie simulator. Are you retarded?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          How did the bird girl get that egg?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            She told the previous dragon enough stories to get it to coom and fly away leaving its egg behind

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The only grimdark are the chances of your character having a bad night of sleep snowrolling minus for the entire day until you get killed by exposure.
        The game intention is anime comfy, not grimdark.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WHFRP 2e

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      is 2e or 4e better for the peasant adventure experience?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        4e is the better system and allows you to become super peasants and other high advancements for landfolk careers.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          stop bullshitting
          2e lets you make characters strong as fuck
          You can literally make knights who 1v1 treemen and trolls and shit
          Or an archer who can kill groups of Chaos Warriors on his lonesome
          Or whatever the fuck
          2e being a peasant simulator is a meme by people who only played short games, you just need to get into the advanced careers for the game to turn into an hydra-suplexing simulator

          Also, 4e doesn't have Ulric's Fury and a terrible Crit system. Thus its worse.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            4e has combat that isn't a whiffing fest, better economy and functioning gunpowder. The career system is better organized and still gives you the freedom you need if you want to. Advantages has its problems, but it still makes combat a lot more dynamic and fast. It's overall an improvement and if OP wants a peasant shit-eating simulator, he can simulate that perfectly well. Someone playing a knight is pretty much not what he wants.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              4e's critical system is still garbage that slows down the game too much
              and it still doesn't have Ulric's Fury
              literally none of the "improvements" make up for that

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Beyond the Wall (basically a retro-clone but the general fluff and theme of the game supports this kind of mood)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Exellent recomendation. It even comes with playbooks to make characters on the fly.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Exellent recomendation. It even comes with playbooks to make characters on the fly.

      Came here to say this. Definitely the best system for that.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Chronicle of Darkness dark eras

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Careful OP. By implying that heroes can be ordinary people, like peasants, you're stepping on the toes of the magicfags that insist anyone who does anything important in any fantasy setting MUST be inherently magical or special. These people shit on any thread that dares to even suggest you can have fun as just a normal person in extraordinary circumstances, let alone achieve anything heroic like slaying dragons.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      if you go on an adventure and or slay a dragon, you are by definition special. if you were ordinary, you would never end up on an adventure.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's a really flawed explanation. A campaign can be about characters becoming more than ordinary from being ordinary people. Here's a basic example progression from 0-8
        >Level 0 - The players are a small group of commoners chasing a single bandit out of their village.
        >Level 1+2 - The players' success with the bandit gets them some attention from the mayor, who turns to them for small combat jobs and security around the town when it's not harvest season
        >Level 3+4 - The players' are a small, reliable gang that has become renowned in the area, and they have retired from farming entirely. When a necromancer sets up in the hills near the town and begins raising the dead from a recent skirmish, they are tasked with tracking him down and dispatching him
        >Level 5 - After killing the necromancer, the players are known regionally as heroes of the duchy. The king invites them to the capitol to deal with a series of bizarre ritual murders, and the players discover that a cult associated with the previous necromancer is responsible.
        >Level 6-7 - The players gradually track down the leaders of the cult, but uncover evidence that the last remaining leader is going to try to summon some archfiend and use it to destroy the capitol
        >Level 8 - The players finally have their fight with the cult leader, and successfully kill him. The campaign either ends, continues to higher levels, or enters a sustaining phase where the players go on various 8th level adventures, similar to epic 6 for 3.5
        You really don't need to do that much to explain how normal people end up on an adventure. It's not like it's a thing that happens all the time, but the idea of it happening is not insane. In actual renaissance and late medieval history, groups like the Landsknecht, Janissaries, and Mamluks were full of people who, for good or bad reasons, had ended up far from home fighting for strange causes in exotic lands without having particular renown.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Boring

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          > It's not like it's a thing that happens all the time
          so NOT ordinary, gotcha. that's all i said to begin with. if you go on an adventure, you are not ordinary. at least not anymore. and as far as dragon slayers go, there is a handful of them, maybe two, and belonging to that very small, very select group is pretty fucking special. it is definitely not ordinary. my complaint isn't that heroes can't come from common backgrounds, i mean that is fantasy trope #3, it is that by virtue of being or becoming a hero you were special from the get go, even if only in regards to becoming a hero. heroes cease to be ordinary when they become heroes, when they do heroic deeds that no else could. and if anybody could do it, then they wouldn't be heroic deeds.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >there is a handful of them, maybe two
            Depends on the setting. AD&D had dragons of all sizes and many different kinds, so your average group had a pretty decent chance of killing one at some point. It was Dungeons and Dragons after all, not Dungeons and No, You Can't Kill That.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Seems to me you've got the horses hitched backwards.
            An ordinary person is still "ordinary" even if they kill a dragon. Being in the right place at the right time to get a job done, planning out how to do it ahead of time, assembling the right group of other ordinary people, those are all things ordinary people can do. Chopping off the head of a big lizard or a hog is just a difference in how you hobble it first. Anybody CAN do heroic deeds, it's not a difference of character or knowhow or skill, it's just being in the right place at the right time, often times accidentally. Pretending that being important or renowned or even "heroic" on occasion requires a certain quality of character is silly. A bandit leader could lead his men to kill a dragon for selfish reasons, is it less heroic to the peasant's who were being raided by it? Well yes after he starts extorting them, but at the time it was heroic.

            Heroic deeds are only so because no one will stretch their neck out and risk their hides to do it. And often times the man who succeeds in the task would just as well have turn tail and run if circumstances didn't force him to be the one to risk his neck. Circumstances and accidents make heroes as often as Character.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              If your dragons are so weak they can be killed by just any group of random losers working in concert, they're kinda shit dragons

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >so NOT ordinary, gotcha.
            Don't you know what ordinary means?

            Having a toothache is ordinary, but doesn't happen all the time. Just as an example.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              So is literally fucking everything ordinary, now? 4 dudes killing a dragon on their own doesn't happen all the time, but its ordinary!

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >if you go on an adventure and or slay a dragon, you are by definition special.

        What about 100 peasants going to slay a dragon?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's a wargame, bro.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Dragons call that a bbq.
          Much like the law of conservation of ninjitsu, 1 plucky peasant boy is far more dangerous than 100.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        If you go on a magical adventure and don't come back with a fucked up curse that grants you amazing power at a terrible price, some kind of crazy mutation, or forbidden knowledge that alienates you from lesser men, then you've had a shitty adventure. A peasant who slays a dragon and drinks of his blood and feasts on his heart should become more than a mere man.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        that's bit more of a modern interpretation.
        In Gygax days being and adventurer was treated more akin to a job.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah, perhaps because for good part of recorded history being a wandering muscle-for-hire that doesn't shy away from nasty jobs as long as they pay is good was a legitimate job too

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >retard forgets all fantasy before Gygax made D&D

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      how can a normal person slay a dragon? Unless its like the size of a big cat or whatever.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous
      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        GURPS, of course

        Feed it a pie full of brimstone that burns through its stomach
        or leave the giant pie in front of its cave, and when it pokes its head out for a sniff, roll a big rock down the hill
        or roll a big rock in front of the cave

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Shut up gurpstard

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            never *~~)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Careful OP. By implying that heroes can be ordinary people, like peasants, you're stepping on the toes of the magicfags that insist anyone who does anything important in any fantasy setting MUST be inherently magical or special.
      an ordinary person somehow obtaining magical abilities or some manner of supernatural aid is an incredibly common plot point in many folktales, fairytales, etc.
      Jack and the Giant Beanstalk, discovering a genie's lamp, finding a Selkie's coat and taking her as your wife, a chance encounter with the Fair Folk, etc.

      the Harry Potter fantasy of born-special wizards going to train magic at wizard-school and being better than muggles in every way is relatively uncommon outside of fucking D&D and of course Harry Potter

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Boring

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      And the best part is that casterfag fingers has typed that retarded bait

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      How does it feel to be ideologically conquered?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In Glorantha even slaves have little bit of magic.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I just realized none of my characters are inherently normal or average joes. It’s not like they have deviantart fanfic tier backstories but I just noticed that

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Any Dungeon Crawl Classics level-0 funnel

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Reminder that TSR invented the level 0 funnel in the 80s.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        No one asked.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous
          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Holy sevens response, you've won the argument.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Mythras

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Probably one of the Warhammer Fantasy RPGs, they're well-known for having career tables mostly comprised of peasant-esque careers in the starting tier.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WHFRP.

    Hope you like rats.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dungeon Crawl Classics.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    D&D 5E. While they may be demigods they still have the brains of a simple peasant never buying gear, using teamwork, thinking they are being smart by flanking only to be caught in a worse position, slinging spells without considering the consequences and entering caves without the proper equipment

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This but unironically. The average 5e party wouldn't survive two sessions with a non-storyshitter DM.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Third-estaters should be quiet and work the fields, heroic adventures are for nobles. If peasants were to go out "adventuring" in the world all they would end up being would be bandits. Only someone born from a divine bloodline chosen by god has the strength of character, radiant virtue and proper rearing to be a proper heroic adventurer. Know your place!

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Warhammer Fantasy

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Old School Essentials

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tentacle labyrinth.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What sets a common man, and a great man apart, is often the opportunity.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Real life. You could LARP everyday.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Harvesting Season Simulator 2022

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >"Big Sister,"
    What's the second word there? My nuke runes isn't good enough yet.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Second word is kenshi, warrior. She's probably using "big sis" colloquially, since familial terms can be used to address strangers. She's saying "Big sis, are you a warrior?"

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I guess literally, kenshi means "swordsman" but warrior/fighter is the gist of it.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Man, I love girls with big appetites but I'm not into fatties.

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm reminded that Tolkien was a massive fan of Chesterton, and G.K Chesterton has a lot of texts about the value of the common average man.

    It basically is an optimistic view of humanity and the individual, about how every person has the *potential* to be extraordinary if the opportunity arises, and how the small things are important.

    Tolkien used this mentality to write extremelly based characters like Bilbo and Sam.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Based and Chesterpilled.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Based, although this is also the man who said that foreign travel narrows the mind. Which I guess is the other kind of based.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Based, although this is also the man who said that foreign travel narrows the mind.
        I wanted to disagree until I thought about it a bit.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          "I have never managed to lose my old conviction that travel narrows the mind. At least a man must make a double effort of moral humility and imaginative energy to prevent it from narrowing his mind. Indeed there is something touching and even tragic about the thought of the thoughtless tourist, who might have stayed at home loving Laplanders, embracing Chinamen, and clasping Patagonians to his heart in Hampstead or Surbiton, but for his blind and suicidal impulse to go and see what they looked like. This is not meant for nonsense; still less is it meant for the silliest sort of nonsense, which is cynicism. The human bond that he feels at home is not an illusion. On the contrary, it is rather an inner reality. Man is inside all men. In a real sense any man may be inside any men. But to travel is to leave the inside and draw dangerously near the outside.
          So long as he thought of men in the abstract, like naked toiling figures in some classic frieze, merely as those who labor and love their children and die, he was thinking the fundamental truth about them. By going to look at their unfamiliar manners and customs he is inviting them to disguise themselves in fantastic masks and costumes."

          TL;DR: People are too retarded to be allowed to experience things. Which is a sentiment I can agree with.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            It's quite interesting hearing an argument about turning the mundane (i.e. the reality/the inside) into the fantastical. For the most part, we only hear arguments of the opposite kind.
            But he's not wrong, since people like to delude themselves in order to escape the present and feel better about themselves.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            This is fucking stupid and a contradiction of the earlier quote.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          "I have never managed to lose my old conviction that travel narrows the mind. At least a man must make a double effort of moral humility and imaginative energy to prevent it from narrowing his mind. Indeed there is something touching and even tragic about the thought of the thoughtless tourist, who might have stayed at home loving Laplanders, embracing Chinamen, and clasping Patagonians to his heart in Hampstead or Surbiton, but for his blind and suicidal impulse to go and see what they looked like. This is not meant for nonsense; still less is it meant for the silliest sort of nonsense, which is cynicism. The human bond that he feels at home is not an illusion. On the contrary, it is rather an inner reality. Man is inside all men. In a real sense any man may be inside any men. But to travel is to leave the inside and draw dangerously near the outside.
          So long as he thought of men in the abstract, like naked toiling figures in some classic frieze, merely as those who labor and love their children and die, he was thinking the fundamental truth about them. By going to look at their unfamiliar manners and customs he is inviting them to disguise themselves in fantastic masks and costumes."

          TL;DR: People are too retarded to be allowed to experience things. Which is a sentiment I can agree with.

          It's quite interesting hearing an argument about turning the mundane (i.e. the reality/the inside) into the fantastical. For the most part, we only hear arguments of the opposite kind.
          But he's not wrong, since people like to delude themselves in order to escape the present and feel better about themselves.

          So the idea is, you can remember that foreigners are people as long as you never see them, but if you actually see them up close you'll start to feel like they're aliens?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Wasn't that why he didn't like Dune, because it was the rich and powerful living in a world of their own and playing games with the world with no value on the average individual?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        He didn't like Dune for a number of reasons, I think it smacked too much of a power-trip, but one could be forgiven for thinking that Paul wasn't that different from Aragorn. It's not like Tolkien had any blanket problem with a divine right to rule.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >OP want an adventure filled with drama, hardship, and success against all odds
    >Its four hours of Team Bilbo storyshitting the trolls so Gandalf Ex Machina can turn them to stone and save the day

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can't do anything heroic unless you're really good at killing shit.

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP here (trans btw) I just shat myself uh oh poopies

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You must have a nice day

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why are you pretending to be me? (Actual OP)

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How is Ryuutama's combat?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's... Strange. Basically it's like an old JRPG. Combat happens on a stage with front and back areas for each side, and you collaboratively place set pieces like walls and barrels that can be used narratively to gain some kind of edge in the battle e.g. kicking over a barrel so it rolls and trips an enemy. Like a lot of Ryuutama it's really cute and interesting bit also a slog mechanically and best used sparingly in order to tell a goofy little story.

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    runequest

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the dark eye

  29. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Rifts or Ninjas and Super Spies

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