85 thoughts on “any games with a feel of adventure”

  1. many open world adventure games almost capture the feeling of adventure, however, personally i feel that combat feels tacked on in those games and detract or completely ruin the sense of adventure. i wish someday we can get an open world adventure game with minimal or no combat, and just focuses on exploration

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  2. >procedural world-gen like dorf fort but from an AI that has been fed a diet of fantasy novels and Jung/Campbell books
    >half of the game is just bushcraft and exploration
    >quest goals like "find X artifact" which requires searching through ancient texts and folkloric tales to figure out where it might have gone when the last civilization to hold the artifact collapsed
    >spend a week searching ruins because of the need to map the site, excavate safely, and keep watch for monstrous raiders from the forest
    Why can’t we have nice things yet?

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  3. The thing is, in order for this adventure feel to actually be fulfilled, you need to not have a single idea of what you’re getting yourself into or what’s waiting for you in the game at any point.

    This immediately disqualifies most popular games whose gameplay format is well known, whose story is just a flimsy excuse for the game, whose world is the same rehashed stuff every time etc like From games, Zelda games, TES games, DQ games, most traditional JRPGs, modern open world games, heavily advertised games, games designed by committee, risk-averse games etc. Don’t get me wrong it’s possible to extract some of that feeling from these games, if you’re playing the IP for the first time or you’re a kid, or otherwise don’t know what to expect and don’t know you’re about to be disappointed, but for most people on Ganker that ship has sailed.

    This means your best bet is to play old AA games you never heard of and people rarely mention, because you will be discovering everything yourself with fresh eyes. Sadly the tech for true adventure games only became available as the industry became too big for its own good, which means that an adventure game with a deserving budget and necessary tech is inherently paradoxical because it will need to appeal to the largest possible audience and advertise itself heavily in order to justify the expense. The only chance of it ever getting better is another crash, which is incredibly unlikely.

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  4. Pic related is literally "Sense of Adventure: The Game"

    >Age of Discovery aesthetic
    >Ode to the RPG’s from 2008-2010

    Look I’m not saying Greedfall is perfect, but it absolutely captures that sense of exploration & adventurism

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    • I didn’t really get that feeling from Greedfall. It did have some cool stuff, like the little camp while you load between regions, and the aesthetic is also preddy gud.

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      • my biggest hope of the future is VR DnD with auto-generated environments by an AI assistant that follows the DM’s voice and adds assets ad hoc as the party progresses

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    • >live in a country where tabletop everything is ridiculously niche and even then, 90% of it is war games
      >no one to play with
      >too self conscious to go full magical realm
      >even if I did, the chance of the other guys not thinking I’m retarded is slim to none
      >don’t see a point if I’m going to half ass it

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  5. I really hope we’ll get a game in the future that does adventuring justice.
    I want to feel as If I’m actually in that world, exploring it.

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  6. Holy shit not a single game ITT actually offers the feel OP asked for, not even remotely, but I guess if you haven’t actually played any games except what Ganker tells you to you wouldn’t have a meaningful frame of reference

    Zoomer palates need to be cleansed, with a shotgun, play better games

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  7. >Shadow of the colossus
    >pre 1.7.10 minecraft(no really)
    >Daggerfall
    >Morrowind
    >Skyrim
    >Oblivion(maybe, I didn’t like it but a lot of people got that impression from it.)
    >Enderal(highly recomended)
    >Journey
    >Outer Wilds
    >Echoes of the eye

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  8. I’ll make one some day. It will be like Kenshi, but with a Runescape-style aesthetic, hundreds upon hundreds of roaming recruitable followers to join your party each with their own quests and background stories and romance options, roguelike elements that generate endless different situations for near infinite replayability and a strong mix of hand-crafted and randomized geographic locations, fully simulated towns and day/night and weather cycles, survival elements and permadeath on by default, and an overarching story written with extreme care with an elaborate lore base on the level of the Legacy of Kain games. How does that sound? Am I missing anything?

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  9. can’t believe no one has said rain world that’s the best one.
    also seconding outer wilds, dark souls, somewhat demon’s souls. most of the other answers here are hilariously retarded

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  10. To have true adventure feels you would have to have an open world where you also have to commit to travel. No way to easily travel around.

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  11. Dark Souls and Xanadu Next are some of the few games that have scratched my adventure itch
    Big open worlds do nothing for me since they always stretch the memorable content thin

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    • Great Adventure games doesn’t even need to be Open World to be majestic. They can be linear as fuck but with the right amount of lore and details linear games could be memorable games.

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    • Gotta agree with this anon, here. Played the remakes for DQ4 and DQ5 on DS back in the day, so I had a decent idea of DQ going in, but it blew me away entirely. Depending on if you want visual fidelity of the original (which I think you have to pirate now, it’s been replaced on most marketplaces) or are interested in more content (much of it is fanservice for past games, some of it tries to connect you to your party more) I would definitely recommend it for a playthrough. Travelling the world as the sky fades into night and you stumble across some ancient ruins to pilfer, or a whole new city to explore, it enthralled me for a good 100 hours at least. Just a comfy game.

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    • I dislike party-era Ys but even I have to admit Y8 was ADVENTURE as fuck. Sunshine Coastline perfectly captures Adol’s sentiment of "I got shipwrecked again?? FUCK YEAH!!" The story and mystery escalates in a great way and finally making your way up the Gendarme is peak Ys.

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  12. I get the feeling of adventure from many semi-open world RPGs like Underrail and Avernum. By semi-open I mean you can explore pretty freely but some areas are unlocked by items or quest progress, and some areas may be too difficult if you go there too early.
    Open world RPGs like Skyrim don’t have the same feeling with almost everything scaling to your level so there aren’t many ‘extra difficult’ dungeons you have to prepare for. Also this kind of open world games are quite empty.

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    • For the 1st half at least.
      >climbing the end of the world
      >they camp for the night 3 times on the way up
      >getting more and more exhausted and think of giving up and just heading home

      Goood shit

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  13. These threads are better at giving that adventure feel than actual games are.
    I don’t think anything ever will, because looking at pictures, or just imagining it is always going to be better than playing something

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  14. for me it was Pathfinder Kingmaker : the map mode, the main quest (taming the virgin land), the narration that looks as a classical fantasy adventure book, the little stories you engage in in various locations – it all screams ADVENTURE to me. I’m playing it blind ofc

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      • I think if they’re able to expand on the structure Bowser’s Fury had going on but with more distinct and wondrous levels they could really make a Mario game feel like an adventure again.

        People just seem to want Odyssey 2 but I think it’d be infinitely more exciting to see Bowser’s Fury as a full fledged game.

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  15. The me the soulsborne games and Sekiro have a great adventure feel if you don’t mind it being in a sad, violent, and lonely world

    On the other hand Monster Hunter World and it’s expansion Iceborne felt like an adventure to me because of the weird ass world full of cool monsters, but the characters and the story aren’t good, the good part is the monsters, the areas, and the gameplay.

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    • The thing about FROM games is that you genuinely end up at a fork in the road often and each path leads to such a wildly different environment, you can never truly expect what you’re going to find even if you’ve already seen most of the areas from far away as part of the background. In most other games, that fork ends up just leading to a detour before leading you back to the main path.

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    • The thing about FROM games is that you genuinely end up at a fork in the road often and each path leads to such a wildly different environment, you can never truly expect what you’re going to find even if you’ve already seen most of the areas from far away as part of the background. In most other games, that fork ends up just leading to a detour before leading you back to the main path.

      your posts literally only apply to DS1
      Sen’s is peak adventure and if there was an entire game like that it would be game of the century.

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  16. Breath of the Wild
    Also I got that feeling from Fallout 76 before they added all the shit npcs in recent updates. It was a barren post apocalyptic playground where you could get lost and do what you wanted. It was great, but since everyone pissed their pants crying about it they added hideous retarded npcs and quests every 5 feet and now it’s your average mediocre bullshit open world garbage
    also old jrpgs

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