Why is hero = sword so common in fantasy?

Why is hero = sword so common in fantasy?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    excalibur

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ah right the least important weapon of a mythological spearman and noble king.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Well I don’t remember the name of his frickin spear but I sure as hell know Excalibur

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Part of that is because his spear's name is a fricking Welsh nightmare to remember, but it's mostly because the sword is vastly more famous. He also has a knife and a shield that turns into a boat.

          He's also a cuckold.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Just like we change Caledsomething to Excalibur, his spear Rhongowhatever is just called Ron in English which is kind of funny

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >my spear, Ron. Mind its mustache.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Lancelot is fanon.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Welsh seems like an insane language.
            >name your kid something evil as frick sounding like Medraut
            >wtf you betrayed me!

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You would think that wouldn't you, English orcus.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What leads you to believe he was primarily a spearman? His battle against King Pellinore had him wielding a sword, his battle against the Roman Leader Tiberius had him wielding a sword. Is it just because he killed Mordred with Rhon? Even his right to be King was decreed by him retrieving the Sword from the Stone, and depending on the cycle- The moment the sword was destroyed, he had to rush to obtain another from the Lady of the Lake because it was just that important. There's even tales of Sir Gawain borrowing Excalibur for quests because of it's vast importance. Rhon exists in name for like... Two myths? Period? It's only a step more relevant than his knife.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          He may be referring to Lancelot. But other than that, he's an absolute moron for trying to downplay the importance of Excalibur.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It was a different sword in the stone. You can stop pretending to be an expert by skimming a wikipedia article now.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Caliburn, yeah. Excalibur was the sword from the lake. But in The Sword in the Stone it was Excalibur and that's what it is now.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >It was a different sword in the stone.
            That much was clear from his post, good job owning yourself.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Well I don’t remember the name of his frickin spear but I sure as hell know Excalibur

        "Swordsman" and "spearman" are both ridiculous video-game inspired nonsense. Knights fought with lances and they fought with swords. They also fought with axes, maces and daggers. They wrestle too, sometimes in the melee, others because their knavish opponents caught them unarmed, or because they had the feeling that the knight in unknown heraldry the cruel damsel compelled him to fight was actually his dear friend or brother. Take your Lancer/Saber bullshit to the nunnery!

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      fpbp also swords is usually symbolic with high officials in armies

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You know why, don't be moronic.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swords were mostly used by nobility. Heroes are generally noble, so they use swords.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Swords were mostly used by nobility.
      Depending on how strictly you want to define sword, this has never been true anywhere in the world. And even if you go with a strict definition of sword, the only thing that nobles did more than peasants was wear them as a part of their common dress.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wut. In many parts of Europe and Asia it was utterly forbidden for peasants to keep and wear swords. Famously in Japan where a peasant would be executed for owning a sword.
        This is why German peasants invented the grosse messer as a technicality to get around the law.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Famously in Japan where a peasant would be executed for owning a sword.
          Peasant couldn't wear daisho in public during the Bakufu because it was tantamount to pretending to be samurai. It was never illegal for them to own a sword.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I uncritically repeat shit I heard on Ganker without researching for myself.
          Why the frick are you like this? Actually read past the headlines. Certain TYPES OF SWORDS were status symbols that could only be owned by the nobility. Just because Watanabe the dirt farmer would be murdered for owning a katana didn't mean he couldn't own a tanto (12" blades were standard before the Meiji reformation, which makes them short swords, not daggers) and even wear if travelling between towns.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nah, actually it goes - hero = revolver

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's actually hero = car battery and jumper cables

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous
  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because it's fun, anon.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Would maces actually be the ideal anti-undead weapon?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Wouldn't maces actually be the ideal undead weapon?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      maces are the ideal weapon period.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swords were just easier to draw.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Haha

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > Flexible, easily understood weapon with plenty of depth.
    > A weapon commonly used by knights, a classic heroic archetype.
    > Isn't as ubiquitous as the spear, giving a slight high-class edge which itself subtly implies power, but is understated enough to not come across as overbearing and gratuitous.
    > A weapon used in melee range, subtly implying courage by needing to engage the dangerous enemy up close.

    That's at least a few reasons.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      what is the opposite of this, but still melee? like a niche weapon with really specific uses, that might be used by the poor, but may also be interpreted as being overbearing or gratuitous?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Scythe's. No one's using that shit, probably not even a poor farmhand if he has any other choice. But we've all collectively decided they're viable because of anime and video games and reaper imagery.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          War scythes were a thing, but they tended to have their blades repositioned to align with the long haft. Likely the origin of weapons like naginatas or guandaos. I know central European peasants made something similar but I can't recall the name. No, I'm not thinking of a falx.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Goedendag, maybe?
        A peasant (bourgeois) weapon, particularly good at fighting buttholes on horses while on foot, with strong cultural ties.
        You show up with one of those, everybody knows which side you're on.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        bec de corbin, or some variation of it maybe?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >a niche weapon with really specific uses, that might be used by the poor, but may also be interpreted as being overbearing or gratuitous?
        like others have said that's the scythe 100%
        it's symbolic in an entirely different way than the sword is, represents commoners (the fricking Soviet flag is a hammer and sickle, another grain cutting implement), it's not really made for war but people still used it for it occasionally because it's what they had on hand, and you simply cannot walk around with a scythe the way you can a sword so holding one sends a very different message. The only people wielding a scythe as a weapon are the fricking grim reaper or a peasant rebellion, both of which are near polar opposites of the classical prince charming hero on a white horse with a sword in hand or a warrior caste like knights

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Axes, hammers, spears, bow&arrow and such are all either tools or hunting implement repurposed for warfare.
    Swords are purpose-made for killing people.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Pic
      ....Is that a boy or a girl?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Any hole's a goal.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Swords have the second most possibility for customization of any fantasy weapon (second only to shields). They are also less brutal than hammers/maces (even if they are more effective), and they have more distinctive fighting styles.

      a sword is an expensive, symbolic weapon of war that you can wear even in non-combat settings for its ceremonial significance, often with elaborate ritual and pomp and circumstance surrounding the specific sword and its sheathe and how it's carried. Knights are not dubbed with a poleaxe, they're dubbed with a sword. Marine Corps officers are not handed a morningstar upon receiving a commission, they're handed a sword. Attending a formal ball in dress uniform with a ceremonial sword on your hip is acceptable, attending a formal ball lugging a twelve-pounder cannon behind you is a lot less feasible.
      Axes, hammers, knives, spears, and other weapons lack the symbology and are often associated with everyday life, commoners, or aren't something you can walk around with as a symbol.

      Call me a partisan, but I love spears. They have always been seen as a military weapon.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swords are cool.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's ingrained in European culture, sword = noble, and is based

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The sword fits in a sheath that rests comfortably on the hip, can your weapon say the same?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. Imagine your favorite movie or whatever, but the protagonist is holding a pole axe. What, he's gonna stick it in the umbrella stand, or is he gonna sit the tavern with one hand holding up this huge swiss army knife?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. Imagine your favorite movie or whatever, but the protagonist is holding a pole axe. What, he's gonna stick it in the umbrella stand, or is he gonna sit the tavern with one hand holding up this huge swiss army knife?

      This is a sorely underrated reason why swords became the weapons of heroes.

      A sword lets the hero move around a scene, deliver dialogue or perform stunts before seamlessly transitioning to combat. There's also the difficulty of choreographing a fight scene involving spears on a small stage or crowded set, the fact that a blunted sword is much safer to be hit with than a blunted polearm and the fact that swords lend themselves to flashy duels in a way that maces just don't.

      Given the influence of plays and then movies on what we consider heroic, it's hardly surprising that the weapon that was most easily incorporated into popular media became the archetypal heroic weapon.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Underrated point. Kids who've grown up on D&D and take fantasy cliches for granted have no idea how indebted the entire genre is to swashbuckling flicks staring men in tights.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I wouldn't be surprised if theater did play a role in it, but I suspect there is something more.

        In 18th, 19th, and very early 20th century warfare, cavalry and military officers carried swords into battle. Still even to this day, many armed forces around the world use swords as part of their dress/parade uniforms. Once repeating and self-loading weapons made swords less practical, why would so many armed forces still choose to bring swords into battle?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Once repeating and self-loading weapons made swords less practical, why would so many armed forces still choose to bring swords into battle?
          Because for most of history, officers were gentlemen, and a gentlemen carried a sword into battle. It wasn't until WWI exterminated Europe's aristocracies that the gentleman-soldier died out.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          As

          >Once repeating and self-loading weapons made swords less practical, why would so many armed forces still choose to bring swords into battle?
          Because for most of history, officers were gentlemen, and a gentlemen carried a sword into battle. It wasn't until WWI exterminated Europe's aristocracies that the gentleman-soldier died out.

          says swords are the weapons of gentlemen. Even in modern militaries officers are considered to be gentlemen (for the most part).

          A significant part of what we consider (in the west at least) as a traditional hero is influenced by writing in the 17th-19th century. Most of this writing was done by gentlemen who treated protagonists as if they were gentlemen (look at Walter Scott and co.) thus they carried the weapon of a gentleman (even if they also used a bow or some other weapon.)

          I'd go far as to say that the fact that heroes are traditionally gentlemen goes as far as determining what type of sword they use. A hero is more likely to use a one handed sword (or one and a half handed) than something like a broadsword or greatsword because gentlemen carried swords suitable for use with one hand.

          pic is of a sabre you can get from some of the ROK army bases.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Same goes for why gunslinging heroes usually have a signature pistol rather than a signature rifle or signature minigun.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because modern audiences can't handle badass shit like Gae Bulg or Lorg Mor or Nu-Endo, and while some people would recognize Ruyi Jingu Bang they think it belongs to Goku and is from Dragon Ball.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    a sword is an expensive, symbolic weapon of war that you can wear even in non-combat settings for its ceremonial significance, often with elaborate ritual and pomp and circumstance surrounding the specific sword and its sheathe and how it's carried. Knights are not dubbed with a poleaxe, they're dubbed with a sword. Marine Corps officers are not handed a morningstar upon receiving a commission, they're handed a sword. Attending a formal ball in dress uniform with a ceremonial sword on your hip is acceptable, attending a formal ball lugging a twelve-pounder cannon behind you is a lot less feasible.
    Axes, hammers, knives, spears, and other weapons lack the symbology and are often associated with everyday life, commoners, or aren't something you can walk around with as a symbol.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why is OP = sucking hundreds of Black person dicks so common on Ganker? Nobody knows

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because in myth sword = hero
    You dumb Black person homosexual.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because the sword is the definitive weapon of the aristocratic warrior class since the bronze age. It is a weapon that uniquely lacks any utility as a tool, and which requires significantly more metallurgical material and skill than axeheads or hammers (along with ifs little brother the dagger), so it is a wealth and social symbol as well as a military one.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swords were crosses. You had bohemian earspoons and all but it wasn't the same.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Spears (on foot) are associated with peasants and formation combat, axe is associated with woodcutting. Mace, warhammer, flail etc were always a fricking meme.
    Sword's only purpose is combat and it's much more expensive/difficult to make than a spear. It's associated with nobility because of that. As well as having a bit of that "swashbuckling" quality due to being a sidearm most of the time.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >t. only plays vidya and doesn't read shit
    Many such cases. Sad!

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sword or death.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's common or not shouldn't affect your games.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    King Arthur and Charlemagne
    No, really

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Some heroes did have weapons that weren't swords, like Cu Chulainn with his Gay Bulge.

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Frick swords. I always pick a war hammer or maul if I want a 2 handed weapon for my characters.

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Spear of Longinus killed Godspawn (or God himself, depending on how you interpert Trinity doctrine).
    Can any sword claim the same?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No it didn't, Jesus was already dead.

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did you consider asking google?

  28. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sword of Mars

  29. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sword historically was considered rather status-weapon than practical one, so dude with the sword -> someone important
    Also, shitton of folklore about magical swords

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